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NANPA Events

2009 NANPA Fall Regional Event

Michigan Regional Event

Online registration is closed. However, you may still register onsite.

North American Nature Photography Association
Sleeping Bear National Lakeshore
October 8-11, 2009

Meeting Schedule

A good five hours drive and a million miles or so from the Motor City lies another Michigan, one that time happily forgot - a peninsula of small hamlets (and one bona fide town) that ends in the hushed splendor of the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore. The Leelanau Peninsula, which juts out into the hypnotic inland seas known as Lake Michigan is a paradise of outdoor activities - swimming, hiking, fishing and canoeing - give it a 9 on our Activities scale. But it is the dunes at Sleeping Bear, which range in color from pale champagne to burnt sienna and which roll and spike to 400 feet in height that earned a perfect 10 in our Splendor category. Here, you can picnic as if you were the last family on earth - and actually feel that way even at the most crowded time of year.

- Smart Money

www.nps.gov/slbe

www.sleepingbeardunes.com

Special Friday trip: South Manitou Island Boat Trip

South Manitou Island is part of an island chain that extends north to the Straits of Mackinac. The island consists of a ridge of tilted layers of limestone, buried under a blanket of glacial debris. Glaciers carved out the Lake Michigan basin. When the basin filled with water, the peaks of the ridge remained exposed as islands. During post-glacial times, winds blowing on the high, sandy bluffs on the west side of the island moved sand inland, forming perched dunes. The dunes are a fragile environment. Participants must stay on existing paths and avoid stepping on plants.

A ranger in attendance will be requested, since this is after the island is closed for the season. There will be no running water, only vault toilets available.

This will be a weather-permitting (Marine forecast) event. We can always change to Saturday. Alternate plans are in place in case it must be cancelled all together.

Tour choices on the island are: The South Manitou Island Lighthouse, The Valley of the Giants, The Bluffs & Perched Dunes, and Shipwreck of the Francisco Morazan

Cancellation Policy
Cancellations received in writing by September 24, 2009 will be issued a refund less a $50 cancellation fee. NO REFUNDS FOR CANCELLATIONS AFTER September 24, 2009. NANPA reserves the right to cancel any event due to insufficient registration or any unforeseen circumstances. In the unlikely event of cancellation, NANPA is not responsible for any costs, damages, or other expenses of any kind, including, without limitation, transportation and/or hotel costs incurred by registrant. Speakers subject to change without notice.

 

Date/Location

October 8, 2009through October 11, 2009
Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore
Glen Arbor, MIUSA

 

 

Registration Fees

Hotel Information

The Homestead Resort
1 Wood Ridge Road
Glen Arbor, MI49636

Phone: 231-334-5000

Hotel Information

Group Code: NANPA09

Rates:
Fiddler’s Pond Standard Room (Queen/Queen) $108
Fiddler’s Pond Deluxe Room (King) $116
Check in: 5pm Check out: 11am

Cut off Date: 9/8/09

 

 

NANPA Regional EventNANPA Regional EventNANPA Regional Event

Events - Click on the speaker name to view their biography.

Events for Thursday, October 08, 2009 Date Time
Registration Oct 8, 2009 4:00 PM to 6:30 PM
 
Introduction and Greetings Oct 8, 2009 6:30 PM to 7:30 PM
  Short introduction and summary of weekend's events by Fall Regional Event Coordinator Kimberli Bindschatel.
Kimberli Bindschatel
Keynote: Michigan Moments Oct 8, 2009 7:30 PM to 8:30 PM
 
In the fall of 2007, Niedzwiecki was offered a two-week creative residency through the Glen Arbor Art Association. In cooperation with Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, she captured many areas of the historic Port Oneida district, miles of spectacular Lake Michigan shoreline, and a variety of unique features of the region. Her multi-media presentation features highlights of the Sleeping Bear National Park, lower Western Michigan, and many beautiful birds, animals and flowers - inviting you to further experience the endless inspiration the area has to offer.
Stacy Niedzwiecki
Events for Friday, October 09, 2009 Date Time
Field Trip: Shipwreck of the Francisco Morazan Oct 9, 2009 7:00 AM to 12:00 PM
 

Gambling with late season Great Lakes weather, but wanting to make one last trip before winter, the Francisco Morazan left Chicago on November 27, 1960. The steel-hulled Liberian freighter was bound for Holland via the St. Lawrence Seaway loaded with 940-tons of general cargo. By the next day, a 40-MPH wind blew out of the northwest, and the Morazan's decks were awash.

After the ship passed the Point Betsie Light, blinded by fog and heavy snow, she ran aground about 300 feet off the southwest shore of South Manitou Island. The owners of the Francisco Morazan could never be found and nothing was done about removing the ship. It is now home to cormorants and gulls. Take the 2.5 mile round trip hike from the Village on South Manitou Island to view the shipwreck.

Robert DeJonge
Field Trip: The Bluffs & Perched Dunes Oct 9, 2009 7:00 AM to 12:00 PM
 
This difficult hike provides the most spectacular views of the island and is well worth the effort. You can make it to one of the highest points on the island where you can see Lake Michigan in every direction! On a clear day you can see Crescent Bay, the lighthouse, North Manitou Island and the Sleeping Bear Dunes on the mainland.
Steven Huyser-Honig
Field Trip: The South Manitou Island Lighthouse Oct 9, 2009 7:00 AM to 12:00 PM
  It is the most familiar landmark on the island and is clearly visible from the mainland. The 100 foot lighthouse tower, active from 1871 to 1958, marked the location of the only natural harbor between here and Chicago. Ships took refuge here during storms and steamers stopped at the island to refuel with wood for their boilers. The keeper's quarters (building on the right) is connected by a covered passage. Be sure to get a tour when you are on the island and climb to the top for a spectacular view.
Stacy Niedzwiecki
Field Trip: The Valley of the Giants Oct 9, 2009 7:00 AM to 12:00 PM
 
The Southwestern corner of South Manitou Island is home to some of the largest White Cedars in Michigan. These trees are over twice as large as the average size White Cedar. The trail loops through this area, so you can get a good appreciation for the size and number of these trees. It is a mystical walk. Some say that these trees were spared because their bark is infused with wind-blown sand, and the lumbermen didn't want to have to continually re-sharpen their saws, which they had to do by hand. This hike is about 0.3 miles beyond the turn-off to the Shipwreck of the Morazan.
Jeff Rabidoux
Field Trip: Shipwreck of the Francisco Morazan Oct 9, 2009 1:00 PM to 6:00 PM
  Gambling with late season Great Lakes weather, but wanting to make one last trip before winter, the Francisco Morazan left Chicago on November 27, 1960. The steel-hulled Liberian freighter was bound for Holland via the St. Lawrence Seaway loaded with 940-tons of general cargo. By the next day, a 40-MPH wind blew out of the northwest, and the Morazan's decks were awash.

After the ship passed the Point Betsie Light, blinded by fog and heavy snow, she ran aground about 300 feet off the southwest shore of South Manitou Island. The owners of the Francisco Morazan could never be found and nothing was done about removing the ship. It is now home to cormorants and gulls. Take the 2.5 mile round trip hike from the Village on South Manitou Island to view the shipwreck.

Robert DeJonge
Field Trip: The Bluffs & Perched Dunes Oct 9, 2009 1:00 PM to 6:00 PM
  This difficult hike provides the most spectacular views of the island and is well worth the effort. You can make it to one of the highest points on the island where you can see Lake Michigan in every direction! On a clear day you can see Crescent Bay, the lighthouse, North Manitou Island and the Sleeping Bear Dunes on the mainland.
Steven Huyser-Honig
Field Trip: The South Manitou Island Lighthouse Oct 9, 2009 1:00 PM to 6:00 PM
 
It is the most familiar landmark on the island and is clearly visible from the mainland. The 100 foot lighthouse tower, active from 1871 to 1958, marked the location of the only natural harbor between here and Chicago. Ships took refuge here during storms and steamers stopped at the island to refuel with wood for their boilers. The keeper's quarters (building on the right) is connected by a covered passage. Be sure to get a tour when you are on the island and climb to the top for a spectacular view.
Stacy Niedzwiecki
Field Trip: The Valley of the Giants Oct 9, 2009 1:00 PM to 6:00 PM
  The Southwestern corner of South Manitou Island is home to some of the largest White Cedars in Michigan. These trees are over twice as large as the average size White Cedar. The trail loops through this area, so you can get a good appreciation for the size and number of these trees. It is a mystical walk. Some say that these trees were spared because their bark is infused with wind-blown sand, and the lumbermen didn't want to have to continually re-sharpen their saws, which they had to do by hand. This hike is about 0.3 miles beyond the turn-off to the Shipwreck of the Morazan.
Jeff Rabidoux
Events for Saturday, October 10, 2009 Date Time
Field Trip: Empire Bluff Oct 10, 2009 6:30 AM to 12:00 PM
  A 1.5 mile round trip, this short trail passes through a lovely beech-maple forest on its way to an overlook at the crest of the Empire Bluffs, 400 feet above Lake Michigan. Along the way are stunning views of the orchards and fields surrounding the town of Empire, Sleeping Bear Dune, and South Manitou Island. This area is very unique because the rocks have striations, sometimes are covered with a bright green shaggy moss and catch the light off the lake.
Jeff Rabidoux
Field Trip: Point Betsie Lighthouse Oct 10, 2009 6:30 AM to 12:00 PM
 
Point Betsie anchors the southern tip of the Sleeping Bear Dunes area and marks the entrance to the Manitou passage, an important shipping lane. An active Coast Guard Station until 1996, the Point Betsie Lighthouse suffered a decade of neglect, but is now receiving extensive historic restoration.

Opportunities for stunning photography abound in this isolated and beautiful location. A short walk along a pebbled beach north of the lighthouse is a large open dune ecosystem home to sand cherry, dune willow, and the endangered Pitcher's Thistle. The crest of Point Betsie dune provides stunning vistas of the lighthouse and the crystal blue waters of Lake Michigan.

Steven Huyser-Honig
Field Trip: Port Oneida Rural Historic District Oct 10, 2009 6:30 AM to 12:00 PM
 
Hike the trails that wind in and around this community of historic farmsteads offering beautiful overlooks of Lake Michigan, passing old barns, farmhouses, milk houses and sugar shacks. Past and present influences of man and nature, in both the buildings and the landscape, are evident throughout the Port Oneida Rural Historic District.

First settled in 1852, this historic community is recognized on the National Register of Historic Places for its significance in agriculture, ethnic heritage and European settlement - which can be experienced through the 22 farmsteads, two cemeteries, two schoolhouses, a log structure and two individual barns. The spatial relationships of historic structures in the district are primarily defined by topography and vegetation. Lake Michigan is an overarching presence, a significant influence on climate and the sensory experience of the visitor, and it played a vital role in the development of the community.

Stacy Niedzwiecki
Field Trip: Sleeping Bear Point-Glen Haven Oct 10, 2009 6:30 AM to 12:00 PM
  Just past the Life Saving Station, this 2.8 mile loop trail takes you past ghost forests formed when trees were buried by the drifting sand and then later uncovered as the sand blew away again. You will experience the terrain left from the melting glaciers and the sculpting of perched dunes by the wind. Instead of walking the whole loop, you may choose to walk through the dunes to the beach.

It is only 1/2 mile to Lake Michigan if you take the spur trail to the Lake. Wildflowers can be found in abundance, as well as many species of butterflies and birds, including the endangered piping plover. The ever-changing dunes provide wonderful opportunities for abstract photographs of wind-sculpted sand, while the native grasses and weeds offer wonderful landscape opportunities.

Robert DeJonge
Pro Presentation: Thinking About and Planning for the Digital Palette Oct 10, 2009 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM
  Thinking About and Planning For the Digital Palette with Robert DeJonge
The imaging world is digital but do you really capture your images with that mind-set? Are you still thinking that your final image is in the viewfinder as you press the shutter? Don't miss out on the fun you can have by using Photoshop to piece together images and "paint" images to create a whole new work of art - and the key is to think that way from square one - when you're out there capturing the images. The workshop will provide plenty of examples on how you can "build" art with your camera.
Image Critiques Oct 10, 2009 2:15 PM to 3:15 PM
  The professional photographers and other participants will critique participants' photographs. The number of photos each participant is allowed to submit will be dependent upon the number of participants attending the event.
Field Trip: Empire Bluff Oct 10, 2009 4:30 PM to 8:00 PM
 
A 1.5 mile round trip, this short trail passes through a lovely beech-maple forest on its way to an overlook at the crest of the Empire Bluffs, 400 feet above Lake Michigan. Along the way are stunning views of the orchards and fields surrounding the town of Empire, Sleeping Bear Dune, and South Manitou Island. This area is very unique because the rocks have striations, sometimes are covered with a bright green shaggy moss and catch the light off the lake.
Jeff Rabidoux
Field Trip: Point Betsie Lighthouse Oct 10, 2009 4:30 PM to 8:00 PM
  Point Betsie anchors the southern tip of the Sleeping Bear Dunes area and marks the entrance to the Manitou passage, an important shipping lane. An active Coast Guard Station until 1996, the Point Betsie Lighthouse suffered a decade of neglect, but is now receiving extensive historic restoration.

Opportunities for stunning photography abound in this isolated and beautiful location. A short walk along a pebbled beach north of the lighthouse is a large open dune ecosystem home to sand cherry, dune willow, and the endangered Pitcher's Thistle. The crest of Point Betsie dune provides stunning vistas of the lighthouse and the crystal blue waters of Lake Michigan.

Steven Huyser-Honig
Field Trip: Port Oneida Rural Historic District Oct 10, 2009 4:30 PM to 8:00 PM
  Hike the trails that wind in and around this community of historic farmsteads offering beautiful overlooks of Lake Michigan, passing old barns, farmhouses, milk houses and sugar shacks. Past and present influences of man and nature, in both the buildings and the landscape, are evident throughout the Port Oneida Rural Historic District.

First settled in 1852, this historic community is recognized on the National Register of Historic Places for its significance in agriculture, ethnic heritage and European settlement - which can be experienced through the 22 farmsteads, two cemeteries, two schoolhouses, a log structure and two individual barns. The spatial relationships of historic structures in the district are primarily defined by topography and vegetation. Lake Michigan is an overarching presence, a significant influence on climate and the sensory experience of the visitor, and it played a vital role in the development of the community.

Stacy Niedzwiecki
Field Trip: Sleeping Bear Point-Glen Haven Oct 10, 2009 4:30 PM to 8:00 PM
 
Just past the Life Saving Station, this 2.8 mile loop trail takes you past ghost forests formed when trees were buried by the drifting sand and then later uncovered as the sand blew away again. You will experience the terrain left from the melting glaciers and the sculpting of perched dunes by the wind. Instead of walking the whole loop, you may choose to walk through the dunes to the beach.

It is only 1/2 mile to Lake Michigan if you take the spur trail to the Lake. Wildflowers can be found in abundance, as well as many species of butterflies and birds, including the endangered piping plover. The ever-changing dunes provide wonderful opportunities for abstract photographs of wind-sculpted sand, while the native grasses and weeds offer wonderful landscape opportunities.

Robert DeJonge
Group Dinner Oct 10, 2009 8:00 PM to 10:00 PM
  The dinner is included with a full registration. Guests may attend for an additional $30 each. Please indicate if you will be attending or not, so the food will be ordered appropriately.

www.westernavegrill.com

Events for Sunday, October 11, 2009 Date Time
Field Trip: Empire Bluff Oct 11, 2009 6:30 AM to 11:00 AM
 
A 1.5 mile round trip, this short trail passes through a lovely beech-maple forest on its way to an overlook at the crest of the Empire Bluffs, 400 feet above Lake Michigan. Along the way are stunning views of the orchards and fields surrounding the town of Empire, Sleeping Bear Dune, and South Manitou Island. This area is very unique because the rocks have striations, sometimes are covered with a bright green shaggy moss and catch the light off the lake.
Jeff Rabidoux
Field Trip: Point Betsie Lighthouse Oct 11, 2009 6:30 AM to 11:00 AM
 
Point Betsie anchors the southern tip of the Sleeping Bear Dunes area and marks the entrance to the Manitou passage, an important shipping lane. An active Coast Guard Station until 1996, the Point Betsie Lighthouse suffered a decade of neglect, but is now receiving extensive historic restoration.

Opportunities for stunning photography abound in this isolated and beautiful location. A short walk along a pebbled beach north of the lighthouse is a large open dune ecosystem home to sand cherry, dune willow, and the endangered Pitcher's Thistle. The crest of Point Betsie dune provides stunning vistas of the lighthouse and the crystal blue waters of Lake Michigan.

Steven Huyser-Honig
Field Trip: Port Oneida Rural Historic District Oct 11, 2009 6:30 AM to 11:00 AM
  Hike the trails that wind in and around this community of historic farmsteads offering beautiful overlooks of Lake Michigan, passing old barns, farmhouses, milk houses and sugar shacks. Past and present influences of man and nature, in both the buildings and the landscape, are evident throughout the Port Oneida Rural Historic District.

First settled in 1852, this historic community is recognized on the National Register of Historic Places for its significance in agriculture, ethnic heritage and European settlement - which can be experienced through the 22 farmsteads, two cemeteries, two schoolhouses, a log structure and two individual barns. The spatial relationships of historic structures in the district are primarily defined by topography and vegetation. Lake Michigan is an overarching presence, a significant influence on climate and the sensory experience of the visitor, and it played a vital role in the development of the community.

Stacy Niedzwiecki
Field Trip: Sleeping Bear Point-Glen Haven Oct 11, 2009 6:30 AM to 11:00 AM
  Just past the Life Saving Station, this 2.8 mile loop trail takes you past ghost forests formed when trees were buried by the drifting sand and then later uncovered as the sand blew away again. You will experience the terrain left from the melting glaciers and the sculpting of perched dunes by the wind. Instead of walking the whole loop, you may choose to walk through the dunes to the beach.

It is only 1/2 mile to Lake Michigan if you take the spur trail to the Lake. Wildflowers can be found in abundance, as well as many species of butterflies and birds, including the endangered piping plover. The ever-changing dunes provide wonderful opportunities for abstract photographs of wind-sculpted sand, while the native grasses and weeds offer wonderful landscape opportunities.

Robert DeJonge

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