2013 AAPB Annual Meeting


Friday Sessions

MEAL3: General Attendee Continental Breakfast

Friday, March 15, 2013
7:00 AM to 8:30 AM



BOS02: Integrative Methods - How Research Can Inform Practice

Friday, March 15, 2013
7:30 AM to 9:00 AM

Beginning with an overview of inflammatory and immune responses this session will examine how recent research points the way to changes in clinical practice and further research. The effects of acute and chronic stress in initiating and controlling parts of the immune response using heart disease as a model will be discussed. The measurement of oxidative stress in human subjects will then be reviewed. The advantages and limitations of these established biomarkers of oxidative stress will then be examined by reference to some recently completed trials in Alzheimers disease. Tthe way people respond to stress, both emotionally and physiologically, has an influence on indices of cellular aging. This is reflected by patterns of dynamic interactions between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems, associated with levels of markers of inflammation, oxidative stress and metabolic risk. Cutting-edge findings and their potential implications for future clinical care and building mind-body resilience are discussed.

Speakers:

  • Kirstin Aschbacher, PhD
  • Jan B. Newman, MD, MA, FACS, ABIHM
  • Joseph Quinn, MD
Featuring discussant Richard Harvey, PhD

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to name at least 3 initiators of the inflammatory response
  • Participants will be able to differentiate antibody mediated immunity from cell mediated immunity
  • Participants will be able to differentiate the effects of acute and chronic stress on the inflammatory response
  • Participants will be able to describe the evidence that oxidative stress is an important mechanism of human disease
  • Participants will be able to list the established biomarkers of oxidative damage which are used to monitor oxidative damage and antioxidant effects
  • Participants will be able to discuss the power and the limitations of these biomarkers after reviewing data from some recently completed clinical trials in Alzheimers disease
  • Summarize recent evidence that certain emotion-regulation processes may make an individual more vulnerable or resilient to the aging process, as indicated by biological markers of cell aging and immune regulation
  • Critique the limitations of the existing literature that hinder integration of this knowledge into current clinical practice
  • Describe the types of studies that would need to be conducted to facilitate translational application of this body of knowledge

Who Should Attend:
All

Level: All


Jan NewmanJan Newman Dr. Jan B. Newman received her MD from SUNY Downstate Medical Center, surgical training at UTMB Galveston and the University of Vermont. She is a fellow of the American College of Surgeons and board certified in Integrative and Holistic Medicine. She is currently practicing preventative medicine. She has studied and practiced meditation, Yoga, Buddhism and biofeedback in the U.S and in India for over 30 years. She received her Master's degree in Integrative Arts and Education. She is dedicated to the integration of sound medical practice with scientifically based multimodality stress reduction for disease mitigation and prevention. She is a nationally requested speaker and has presented on topics including Stress: Manifestations, Mechanisms, and Management, Spirituality and Health, the Relationship of Stress and Disease, Oxytocin the Anti-stress Hormone, Cardiopulmonary Anatomy and Physiology and the response of the Cardiopulmonary System to Stress.

Joseph QuinnJoseph Quinn Completed bachelor's in biochemistry at Harvard, MD at Univ of Southern California, and neurology residency at Oregon Health and Sciences. Does "translational" research on treatable mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease, including in vitro studies, animal studies, and clinical trials. Supported by NIH and VA grant funding. Over 85 peer-reviewed publications.


BOS03: Quantitative Surface Electromyography...
BOS03: Quantitative Surface Electromyography: Opening New Avenues in the Rehabilitation of Motor Dysfunction

Friday, March 15, 2013
8:00 AM to 9:00 AM

QSEMG represents a new innovative approach within the field of rehabilitation. When rehabilitating a motor disorder multiple muscles are always involved. Training one or two muscle sites will change individual muscle recruitment but is not sufficient for changing motor function. One must understand the underlying dynamics of the myotatic unit involved in the desired movement pattern (such as bringing a cup to the mouth). Patterned responses are rewarded rather than discrete muscles. This approach is similar to the Z-score used in neurofeedback where multiple variables are monitored at more than one brain site with a reward activated as these multiple variables move toward a more normal pattern.

Speaker:

  • Jeff Bolek, PhD, BCB

Learning Objectives:

  • The attendee will be able to apply the concepts of QSEMG in treating patients with motor dysfunction
  • The attendee will be able to prepare a blueprint with which to investigate the relevant muscles involved in the motor dysfunction
  • The attendee will be able describe the problem with the use of only changes in the microvolt level as a measure of progress in motor rehabilitation
  • The attendee will be able to explain the foundation of QSEMG as it relates to augmented feedback

Who Should Attend:
Psychologists, physical/occupational therapists, coaches, any professional involved in the treatment of motor dysfunction as the result of stroke, head injury, etc.

Level: All

Jeffrey BolekJeffrey Bolek Creator and Director, Motor Control Program, Cleveland Clinic, since 1988, Ph.D. from Kent State University, many original publications on the characteristics of the SEMG signal and its use in the rehabilitation of motor dysfunction, creator of QSEMG, quantitative surface electromyography, the topic of this presentation.


BOS37 - Infra-low Frequency Neurofeedback...
Infra-low Frequency Neurofeedback: Methods, Mechanisms, and Clinical Results

Friday, March 15, 2013
8:00 AM to 9:00 AM

Over the last seven years we have developed a novel method of doing neurofeedback based on information derived from the infra-low frequency region of the EEG, i.e. below 0.1 Hz. The method combines features of standard frequency-based training, standard slow-cortical potential training, and peripheral biofeedback. The method differs from standard SCP-training by using continuous feedback rather than episodic. It differs from standard frequency-based neurofeedback by operating on the time-domain rather than the frequency-domain waveform. It retains the characteristic of frequency-based neurofeedback that the training is highly dependent on the choice of target frequency. The frequency specificity is such that an optimization procedure must be followed to obtain the best results.

Results will be presented for 350 CPTs conducted with our clients utilizing this method. Results of a comprehensive survey of over 300 cases of PTSD will also be shown. A promising new method appears to be emerging.

Speaker:

  • Siegfried Othmer, PhD

Learning Objectives:

  • The attendee will be able to describe the essential kinship of ILF Neurofeedback and biofeedback methods such as HRV.
  • The attendee will be able to articulate the role of intrinsic connectivity networks in underpinning good brain regulatory function.
  • The attendee will be able to explain why the various relaxation techniques being promoted within the biofeedback field are so effective in enhancing CNS regulatory competence.
  • The attendee will appreciate the relative advantages and disadvantages of ILF NF vis-a-vis standard frequency-based neurofeedback, standard SCP-training, and peripheral biofeedback.

Who Should Attend:
Clinicians and Research-oriented professionals; graduate students

Level: Intermediate/Advanced


Siegfried OthmerSiegfried Othmer Siegfried Othmer received his Ph.D. in physics at Cornell University in 1970. He has been active in the development of EEG neurofeedback for some twenty-eight years, along with his wife Susan. After an initial focus on ADHD children, their work has increasingly encompassed the more serious afflictions such as the autism spectrum, Bipolar Disorder, Tourette Syndrome, trauma conditions (PTSD and TBI), developmental delay, and the problem of addiction. An additional focus has been on educational performance in children and optimum performance in adults. Dr. Othmer has been active in all aspects of the field: instrumentation development, professional training, clinical service delivery, clinical research, and publication in both professional and popular media. The Othmers have also built a large practitioner network that now extends to many countries around the world. They have taught neurofeedback professionals in eleven countries.


Oral Presentations 1

Friday, March 15, 2013
8:00 AM to 9:00 AM

Effects of a Brief Intervention for Entering Third Year Medical Students
Angele McGrady, PhD

Neurofeedback Training as a New Method in Treatment of Crystal Methamphetamine Dependent Patients
Fateme Dehghani Arani, PhD; Reza Rostami, PhD

Utilizing Heartbeat Evoked Potentials to Identify Cardiac Regulation of Vagal Afferents
Richard Gevirtz, PhD; Starr MacKinnon, MA

Interventions for Grandmothers: Resourcefulness versus Biofeedback
Jaclene A. Zauszniewski, PhD, RN-BC, FAAN; Tsay-yi (Amy) Au, PhD, RN; Carol M. Musil, PhD, RN, FAAN


Opening Welcome & President's Address

Friday, March 15, 2013
9:15 AM to 9:30 AM



KEY2: Keynote Address: Neural Devices and Biofeedback for Rehabilitation...
Neural Devices and Biofeedback for Rehabilitation of the Damaged Central Nervous System by Chet Moritz, PhD

Friday, March 15, 2013
9:30 AM to 10:30 AM

Neural Devices and Biofeedback for Rehabilitation of the Damaged Central Nervous System

Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) and biofeedback technology have the potential to dramatically improve quality of life after paralysis resulting from spinal cord injury, stroke or traumatic brain injury. We demonstrated that brain activity can be used to control Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) delivered to muscles and reanimate simple movements of an otherwise paralyzed wrist. In addition to direct muscle stimulation, another promising approach is intraspinal stimulation. We quantified the hand and arm movements evoked by cervical spinal stimulation. In addition to directly restoring movements, intraspinal stimulation may also aid in guiding recovery and promoting regeneration after injury to the spinal cord. Biofeedback via neural interfaces may also improve quality of life after brain injury. We have evidence that feedback of muscle activity, routed through a computer game, can improve hand function following stroke, traumatic brain injury, or for children with cerebral palsy.

About Dr. Moritz:
Chet Moritz received his PhD from the University of California, Berkeley, studying the biomechanics of human movement. He then completed a post-doc at the University of Colorado investigating the neural control of precision hand movement. A second post-doc at the University of Washington began his interest in brain-computer interfaces and neuroprosthetic technology to treat paralysis. His is now an Assistant Professor in the departments of Rehabilitation Medicine and Physiology & Biophysics. His research uses a combination of animal models and human studies to explore novel treatments for paralysis and paresis following injury to the central nervous system (e.g., SCI, TBI, Stroke, and cerebral palsy).



Networking Break & Posters Available for Viewing in the Exhibit Hall

Friday, March 15, 2013
10:30 AM to 11:00 AM



BOS04: Presidential Lecture: The Pulse of Performance...
Presidential Lecture: The Pulse of Performance: Studies in Applied Performance Science

Friday, March 15, 2013
11:00 AM to 12:00 PM

Performing music at the highest of international levels can require the management of intense physical and mental demands. How musicians perceive and manage these demandsand deliver high quality performances consistently under pressurecan determine not only the success of single events but also the path and length of their careers. This presentation will explore recent work within the Centre for Performance Science at the Royal College of Music, London, examining expert musicians' physiological and psychological responses in both low- and high-stress performance conditions. It will also report new initiatives aimed at training students to manage these demands effectively, and in particular a new performance simulator in which musicians are able to perform to and interact with a virtual audience.

Speaker:

  • Aaron Williamon, BA, BS, PhD

Who Should Attend:
All

Level: All

Aaron WilliamonAaron Williamon Aaron Williamon is Professor of Performance Science at the Royal College of Music (RCM). His research focuses on skilled performance and applied scientific and health-related initiatives that inform music learning and teaching. His book, Musical Excellence, is published by Oxford University Press and draws together the findings of initiatives from across the arts and sciences with the aim of offering musicians new perspectives and practical guidance for enhancing their performance. Aaron is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (FRSA) and the UK's Higher Education Academy (FHEA). In addition, he has performed as a trumpeter in chamber and symphony orchestras, brass bands, and brass quintets in both Europe and North America.


BOS05: HRV and Back Pain

Friday, March 15, 2013
11:00 AM to 12:00 PM

DESCRIPTION PENDING - 11/26/2012

Speakers:

  • Richard Gevirtz, PhD, BCB
  • Frank Andrasik, PhD, BCB

Learning Objectives:

  • LEARNING OBJECTIVES PENDING - 11/26/2012

Who Should Attend:
TBA

Level: TBA

Richard GevirtzRichard Gevirtz Dr. Richard Gevirtz is a Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the California School of Professional Psychology at Alliant International University in San Diego. His research and practice in recent years has focused on psychophysiological mechanisms and treatment of disorders affected by the autonomic nervous system, such as, IBS, Non-Cardiac Chest Pain, TMD, Headache, and other muscle pain syndromes. He is one of the first researchers and clinicians to explore heart rate variability biofeedback. He has presented workshops on these topics throughout the world over the last 15 years. Dr. Gevirtz is the author of numerous peer reviewed articles and chapters. He has been the chair of Biofeedback Certification Institute of America and was the president of the Association of Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback. He was honored with the AAPB Distinguished Scientist Award in 2008 and the Sheila Adler Service award in 2005. For the past several years he has been on the editorial board of Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback, and was named in 2005 as Associate Editor. .

Frank AndrasikFrank Andrasik Dr. Andrasik presently serves as Distinguished Professor and Chair, Department of Psychology, University of Memphis. He previously had the title of Distinguished University Professor at the University of West Florida and was appointed as a Senior Research Scientist at the Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition. Frank was also on the faculty of the State University of New York at Albany where he also held the positions of Research Associate Professor in the Department of Neurology and Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Family Practice at Albany Medical College. Frank is the current Editor-in-Chief for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback and is a past president of AAPB as well as the Association for Cognitive and Behavioral Therapies. He has numerous publications and years of clinical practice in the biofeedback treatment of headache.


BOS06: Repeated qEEG Measurements on Volunteers Receiving LENS Therapy

Friday, March 15, 2013
11:00 AM to 12:00 PM

This session will discuss the effects of 28 LENS treatments as documented by repeated measures using qEEG. This study was conducted with 30 volunteers over a period of one year. The focus will be on the changes that occured in absolute power, coherence, and phase lag. Improvements in sleep, cognitive functioning, and sense of wellness will be mentioned. Cluster analysis revealed a sub-group that was particularly predictive of positive changes.

Speakers:

  • Stuart Donaldson, PhD, BCB
  • Patricia Doneen Moran, BCB-T
  • Chris Rozell, MC, R. Psych
  • Mary Donaldson, MEd

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the non-specific effects of LENS
  • Understand the impact of LENS on absolute power in relation to both frequency and location
  • Understand the clinical utility of LENS therapy

Who Should Attend:
Practioners of EEG biofeedback as well as those interested in learning more about LENS

Level: All

Stuart DonaldsonStuart Donaldson Stuart Donaldson PhD is a licensed psychologist practicing in Calgary, Alberta. He has studied chronic pain and a number of other conditions over a period of 30 years with a multi-disciplinary team of co-workers from different disciplines. He started using LENS treatment with his chronic pain population and has expanded this service into other areas. He has published over 30 papers on a number of different issues. His work is widely recognized having presented materials all over the world.

Patricia Doneen MoranPatricia Doneen Moran Patricia Doneen Moran is a psychological assistant and biofeedback technicial at Myosymmetries clinic

Chris RozellChris Rozell Chris Rozell has been working in the human services for over 15 years, and has extensive experience working with children and adults with developmental disabilities. He has a masters of counselling psychology and is currently a registered provisional psychologist in Alberta. For the last two years, he has been a part of the Myosymmetries team, using counselling and biofeedback to assist individuals and their families to achieve a greater sense of wellness.

Mary DonaldsonMary Donaldson Mary Donaldson has treated over 1000 patients using LENS techniques. She has a masters in Computers and Media Technology in education, a diploma in library science, a B.SC in genetics and was an EMT-A driving ambulances (since retired). She works with her husband Stuart heading the neurotherapy section of their practice. She has trained with Joel Lubar, Robert Thatcher and Len Ochs. She has co-published several articles with Stuart.


BOS07: Biofeedback for Executive Wellness

Friday, March 15, 2013
11:00 AM to 12:00 PM

This presentation will focus on data and lessons learned from 10,000+ healthy executives and the value of using biofeedback to promote subjective well-being (SWB). Measurement of SWB will be explained. A self-report assessment tool will be described as it measures life satisfaction in 16 domains of lifean important component of SWB.Executives are adept at self-regulation within a command and control framework but fairly ignorant of biofeedback and relaxation. Biofeedback approaches offer a technique equivalent to gaining control by letting go of control and this is easily understood by executives. Data will be presented that executives routinely sacrifice personal well-being in the mental and physical domains to achieve goals in work and loving relationship domains. Biofeedback and behavioral coaching can help restore balance.

Speaker:

  • Jerome Kiffer, BCB

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe biofeedback training to control stress responses.
  • Explain Subjective Well-Being measurement as comprised of life satisfaction in multiple domains of life.
  • Discuss self-regulation of cognition, affect, and behavior to improve well-being.
  • Demonstrate psychophysiologic indicators to be used as biomarkers for the impact of self-regulation.

Who Should Attend:
All participants interested in promoting wellness and biofeedback training.

Level: All


Jerome KifferJerome Kiffer Jerry Kiffer started at the Cleveland Clinic in 1975. He has a Master's degree in Psychology from Cleveland State University and completed all psychology pre-doctoral studies at Case Western Reserve University. Jerry has authored articles on stress, biofeedback, and executive health coaching. He is a teacher, clinician, and researcher. He's been married for 39 years and has 5 children. Jerry is the Coordinator of the CCF Psychological Testing Center and a therapist in the Neurological Institute's Department of Psychiatry and Psychology. Over the past 10 years, he has consulted with 10,000 executives for executive health coaching in the Wellness Institute's Executive Health Program. He co-wrote and implemented the Stress Management Group component of the Ornish-like disease reversal program, Lifestyle 180, at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute. He is a co-investigator on heart-rate variability biofeedback research.


BOS08: HRV Biofeedback for Stress Management

Friday, March 15, 2013
11:00 AM to 12:00 PM

Biofeedback is the only non-pharmaceutical approach that has been approved by the FDA to treat disorders such as hypertension, and a number of research studies have demonstrated that biofeedback is an effective adjunct to therapy for treating depression, anxiety, etc. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss different ways that biofeedback can be incorporated into stress management and psychotherapy programs to increase their effectiveness. This presentation will begin by explaining how biofeedback impacts the stress response and then explores how biofeedback can by employed as part of an overall intervention approach. Perhaps most interestingly, research data will be presented which demonstrates that combining biofeedback with psychotherapy leads to both significantly better outcomes as well as faster recovery.

Speakers:

  • Patrick Steffen, PhD
  • Barbara Morrell, PhD
  • Louise Fidalgo, BS

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand how biofeedback and stress management can impact the stress response
  • Learn how biofeedback can be integrated into an overall stress management program
  • Learn how biofeedback can be employed as an effective adjunct to psychotherapy

Who Should Attend:
Those interested in integrating biofeedback into stress management and psychotherapy programs.

Level: Introductory


Patrick SteffenPatrick Steffen Patrick Steffen's broad research interests lie in the areas of health psychology and behavioral medicine, with specific interests in culture, spirituality, and health. He is particularly interested in the Hispanic Paradox and how disadvantaged groups display resiliency and positive adaptation in spite of significant stressors. He has authored and co-authored articles in Psychosomatic Medicine, Annals of Behavioral Medicine, Journal of Behavioral Medicine, American Journal of Hypertension, Ethnicity and Disease, and Mental Health, Religion, and Culture; and co-authored chapters in the Oxford Handbook of Health Psychology and the Handbook of Primary Care Psychology. Dr. Steffen is currently an associate professor and associate director of clinical training in the Brigham Young University clinical psychology program. Before coming to BYU, Steffen was a postdoctoral research fellow in cardiovascular behavioral medicine at Duke University Medical Center. He received his PhD and master's degrees at the University of Miami in clinical health psychology, and a bachelor's degree in psychology with minors in statistics and philosophy from Brigham Young University.

Barbara MorrellBarbara Morrell BIOGRAPHY PENDING - 1/2/2013

Louise FidalgoLouise Fidalgo Louise Fidalgo is a graduate student at BYU with interests in clinical health psychology and using biofeedback as adjunct treatment in psychotherapy.


BCIA101: BCIA Cetification 101 with Judy Crawford

Friday, March 15, 2013
12:00 PM to 12:30 PM

If you have ever wondered about becoming a BCIA certified practitioner in Biofeedback, Neurofeedback, or Pelvic Muscle Dysfunction Biofeedback, this informal discussion will lead you through the process and requirements and answer any questions you may have.

Judy CrawfordJudy Crawford Judy Crawford - BIOGRAPHY PENDING - 11/26/2012


BOS09: Neurofeedback using LORETA and sLORETA

Friday, March 15, 2013
12:00 PM to 1:00 PM

This breakout session will discuss applications of Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomographic Analysis (LORETA) and Standardized LORETA (sLORETA) in assessment and neurofeedback. Experienced clinicians and researchers who have worked with this technique will be on the panel, which will discuss technical foundations and clinical realities of this approach. This method allows the measurement and feedback of specific brain locations, rather than surface locations alone. It is possible to access, for example, activity in the cingulate cortex, frontal cortex, or parietal areas specifically, providing unique and effective neurofeedback for a variety of conditions and applications.

Speakers:

  • Thomas Collura, PhD, BCN
  • Penijean Rutter-Gracefire, LMHC, CRC, BCN
  • Dick Genardi, PhD

Learning Objectives:

  • Summarize the technical foundations of Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography of the brain
  • Recognize LORETA and sLORETA images and interpret the brain locations indicated
  • Utilize LORETA and sLORETA in assessment of brain function
  • Utilize LORETA and sLORETA in neurofeedback

Who Should Attend:
Neurofeedback practitioners and researchers

Level: Intermediate

Thomas ColluraThomas Collura Dr. Collura is currently president of BrainMaster Technologies, Inc., and a graduate student in Mental Health Counseling at Walden University, Minneapolis, MN. He received the Ph.D. in 1978 in Biomedical Engineering from Case Western Reserve University for research on visual and auditory evoked potentials and attention. He served for 8 years on the staff of the Department of Neurology, Cleveland, Clinic, developing computerized EEG monitoring and mapping systems. He is the founder of BrainMaster Technologies, Bedford, OH, a developer of EEG and neurofeedback systems. He has over 20 peer reviewed papers and book chapters in the areas of EEG, evoked potentials, and neurofeedback. He is a past president of the ISNR, and a past president of the neurofeedback division of the AAPB. He recently chaired the IEEE standards effort on Recommended Practice for Neurofeedback Systems, whose standard was approved in 2012.

Penijean GracefirePenijean Gracefire Penijean Gracefire, LMHC, CRC, BCN, has ten years' experience working with both low functioning and high risk populations, including profoundly disturbed adolescents and adults with developmental disabilities. She contracted for two years with the Center for Rational Living as a cognitive behavioral therapist, rehabilitating DUI and drug offenders on probation, and training new therapists. She served for five years as the Clinical Services Director at CNS Wellness of Tampa Bay, using neurofeedback, biofeedback and cognitive behavioral interventions on populations with autistic spectrum disorder, chronic anxiety and depression, traumatic brain injury, substance abuse, AD/HD and OCD. Her recent clinical research has focused on methods to improve neural connectivity in individuals with compromised function. She currently works with StressTherapy Solutions, Inc. as a clinical consultant and educational coordinator, helping to create and teach training programs and materials, and to develop clinical applications for brain imaging and intervention software.

Dick GenardiDick Genardi Dick Genardi - BIOGRAPHY PENDING - 11/26/12


STURNDF: Welcome Lunch for New Members, First Time Attendees and Students

Friday, March 15, 2013
12:00 PM to 1:00 PM

New members, first-time attendees and students are invited to a networking lunch with AAPB leaders to get acquainted with AAPB and the happenings at the Annual Meeting. A box lunch will be provided.


BOS10: Management and Interpretation of Heart Rate Variability Data

Friday, March 15, 2013
12:00 PM to 1:30 PM

The development of competency in HRV research and clinical HRV biofeedback depends critically on the interpretation of inter-beat interval data. This breakout session will provide attendees a foundation of conceptual and practical understanding of HRV data. Issues and solutions in the management, analysis, and interpretation of HRV data will be presented and applied to specific research topics and clinical cases of the presenters. Basic time- and frequency domain variables through non-linear HRV modelling will be discussed. Consideration will be given to analysis of individual protocols and proceed through cutting edge approaches to large group dataset constructs, sophisticated recording systems, and advanced analytic software. The session will address practical, how-to questions and concerns that are relevant to datga management in the HRV lab and HRVB clinic. Current theoretical models of HRV data reflecting health and well-being will be presented.

Speakers:

  • J.P. Ginsberg, PhD
  • Robert L. Drury, PhD
  • Wasyl Malyj, PhD

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss methods for effective management and analysis of HRV data
  • Explain the clinical importance of HRV data in models of health and illness
  • Describe the extraction of nonlinear components and vectors from HRV datasets
  • Describe an integrated hardware/software/computer analytic system for acquiring, recording and algorithmically analysing HRV data (ECG, respiration depth and frequency, 3 axis accelerometry, EEG, EMG, nasal flow and stethoscopic microphony)
  • Discuss the multiple uses of an integrated hardware/software/computer analytic system for acquiring, recording and algorithmically analysing HRV data, including pre post and during treament assessment, home all night polysomnography,digital epidemiology

Who Should Attend:
Everyone who is interested in HRV

Level: All

Jay GinsbergJay Ginsberg Jay Ginsberg, PhDreceived a BS in Biology cum laude from Yale University, and his doctorate in Clinical Psychology/Neuropsychology from the University of Memphis. Dr. Ginsberg has dual employment at the Dorn VAMC in Columbia in the mental health and clinical research services. He is PI on a Department of Defense funded grant studying autonomic balance and early stage information processing in combat Veterans with PTSD which is in the final stage of data analysis. Dr. Ginsberg has 24 peer-reviewed publications on Neuropsychology, neuropsychological aspects of mental illness, and heart rate variability. He currently is Guest Associate Editor of a Research Topic special issue of Frontiers in Psychology Clinical Settings entitled: 'Dysregulation of Autonomic Cardiac Control by Traumatic Stress and Anxiety'

Robert DruryRobert Drury Dr. Rob Drury serves as Chief of Psychology Services at the Madison VAMC in Madison, WI. Specializing in Clinical Health Psychology, he provides assessment, treatment, training and supervison services to the VA. He also has an appointment in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, School of Medicine and Public Health and is engaged in collaborative research with Richard Davidson and colleagues of the Waisman Center for Neuroscience on the role of the central and autonomic nervous systems, especially the vagal nerve in understanding and treating PTSD and other trauma related disorders, such as mTBI and chronic pain. He is an Affiliate at the Wisconsin Institues of Discovery's Morgridge Research Institute where he is developing an advanced technolnogical system for acquiring , recording, analysing and using HRV+ data for clinical and research purposes, including the development of a Resilience Coach app that incorporates real time HRV.

Wasyl MalyjWasyl Malyj Dr. Malyj is an expert in high-performance informatics systems focused on data acquisition and analysis, data fusion, data mining, pattern recognition, and extracting nonlinear components and basis vectors from complex datasets. He has consulted extensively to industry and academia. He has had a strong interest in HRV since the mid-1970s. Since then, thousands of scientific articles have been published examining HRV in clinical environments and applications, nutrition, athletic training and conditioning, weight loss, exercise for the elderly, stress reduction, monitoring sepsis and the inflammatory process, and determining the most appropriate medicine for a specific individual. Significant increases in affordable data acquisition and high-performance computation today allow the development of novel algorithms and visualization tools that can extract a more robust and comprehensive HRV analysis than in previous approaches. Such technologies may soon be ready for use by clinicians to 'personalize' the medical therapies, health, and nutrition of their patients.


SEC10: Optimal Functioning Section Meeting
Special presentation by Dr. Len Zaichowsky

Friday, March 15, 2013
12:00 PM to 1:30 PM

Optimal Performance Section Meeting
Special presentation by Dr. Len Zaichowsky

The Optimal Functioning Section was organized to discuss and explore uses of biofeedback and applied psychophysiology for optimizing health, mental, physical, emotional and spiritual functioning, and peak performance fields. The section holds a meeting in conjunction with the Annual Conference, and sponsors invited symposia and presentations from recognized experts.

Len ZaichowskyLen Zaichowsky Len Zaichowsky - BIOGRAPHY PENDING 11/27/2012


BCIA Recertification 101

Friday, March 15, 2013
12:30 PM to 1:00 PM

Let BCIA tell you about changes in recertification policy that makes it a very user-friendly process. Come bring your questions about recertification.


BOS11: EEG and QEEG in the Prediction of Medication Response

Friday, March 15, 2013
1:30 PM to 3:00 PM

This session will bring experts together to describe the research and clinical practice of using EEG to predict the response to medications, and to help to select medications. Key EEG signatures of individual differences, and of specific disorders, will be described. The ability to predict medication response based on EEG is an emerging field with a significant evidence base. It has been shown that outcomes can be considerably improved by considering the value of EEG properties in evaluating possible medications for clients with various disorders.

Speakers:

  • Thomas Collura, PhD, BCN
  • Jay Gunkelman, QEEGT
  • Harry Kerasidis, MD, BCN

Learning Objectives:

  • Recognize and describe the EEG signatures of specific individual profiles and disorders
  • Use EEG as a criterion for evaluating which medications will likely be effective
  • Describe the effects of various medications on EEG and on clinical outcomes for specific disorders

Who Should Attend:
Marriage and family therapist, social workers, counselors, psychologists, psychiatric nurses and primary care physicians

Level: Intermediate

Thomas ColluraThomas Collura Dr. Collura is currently president of BrainMaster Technologies, Inc., and a graduate student in Mental Health Counseling at Walden University, Minneapolis, MN. He received the PhD in 1978 in Biomedical Engineering from Case Western Reserve University for research on visual and auditory evoked potentials and attention. He served for 8 years on the staff of the Department of Neurology, Cleveland, Clinic, developing computerized EEG monitoring and mapping systems. He is the founder of BrainMaster Technologies, Bedford, OH, a developer of EEG and neurofeedback systems. He has over 20 peer reviewed papers and book chapters in the areas of EEG, evoked potentials, and neurofeedback. He is a past president of the ISNR, and a past president of the neurofeedback division of the AAPB. He recently chaired the IEEE standards effort on Recommended Practice for Neurofeedback Systems, whose standard was approved in 2012.

Jay GunkelmanJay Gunkelman Jay Gunkelman has been in the EEG and biofeedback field since 1972, now acting as the Chief Science Officer for Brain Science International and consulting on EEG/qEEG/ERP cases internationally. The author of the original phenotype model, Jay is actively prospectively testing the models predictions for both Neurotherapy protocols, as well as medication treatments. Jay is a popular international lecturer on EEG/qEEG and Neurofeedback.

Harry KerasidisHarry Kerasidis Dr. Kerasidis received his bachelor of science degree in zoology at George Washington University in 1981. He completed a master of science degree in human physiology at Georgetown University in 1982. He was awarded his doctor of medicine from Georgetown University where he also completed his internship and neurology residency. Dr. Kerasidis has been a member of the Calvert Memorial Hospital Medical Staff since 1992. He has been the Director of Calvert Memorial Hospital's Sleep Disorders Center since 1993, and Director of the Stroke Center since 2007, and the Director of the Center for Neuroscience since it began in 2010. Dr. Kerasidis is board certified in neurology by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, and is certified by the American Board of Sleep Disorders, and a Diplomate in QEEG. He has been published in several medical journals including Neuroscience Abstracts, Experimental Neurology, and Journal of Neuroscience Methods. He is the creator of the "xlntbrain" system for working with athletes at risk of concussive injury.


BOS12: Using HRV Biofeedback with Couples...
BOS12: Using HRV Biofeedback with Couples from an Imago Relationship Therapy and Gottman Method Couples Therapy Perspective

Friday, March 15, 2013
1:30 PM to 3:00 PM

Couples typically enter couples therapy as a result of a crisis in their relationship. The crisis typically comes after the couple drifts apart emotionally. With the crisis there is emotional reactivity present in the relationship as well. Current brain research shows that little if any constructive re-healing or strengthening of the relationship can take place if reactivity is high. HRV Biofeedback is showing promise as an adjunctive aid in helping individuals to emotionally and physiologically "slow down" and reset their autonomic nervous system and emotional "setpoint". Two couple therapy approaches (Imago Relationship Therapy and Gottman Method Couples Therapy) help couples strengthen their ability to create more effective contact and connection. In this workshop, the presenters will share how each is using HRV biofeedback in conjunction with their respective couple approaches to help couples reduce reactivity and strengthen their contact and connection with each other.

Speakers:

  • Ray Varlinsky, MA, MFT, BCB, BCN
  • Walter J. Ciecko, PhD, BCB

Learning Objectives:

  • Understanding the impact and effect of distress on relationship
  • Learn about the Imago Relationship Therapy approach to couple therapy
  • Learn about the Gottman Method Couples Therapy approach to couple
  • Learn how HRV biofeedback is used in conjunction with couple therapy to reduce reactivity and strengthen an individual's ability to be present to myself and their partner

Who Should Attend:
Marriage and family therapist, social workers, counselors, psychologists, psychiatric nurses and primary care physicians

Level: Intermediate

Ray VarlinskyRay Varlinsky Ray Varlinsky is a licensed California Marriage and Family Therapist with over 15 years experience working with couples and individuals in his private practice. Ray is a certified Gottman Method Therapist and Gottman Couples ASL Workshop Leader and a frequent presenter at the Annual Gottman Conferences. He is BCB biofeedback and neurofeedback certified with 28 years of experience using biofeedback in medical institutions. Ray has taught for 26 years in the psychology department at Butte College. He was been using Heartmath technologies and HRV instruments in his private practice, workshops and conferences for the last 10 years. He has facilitated the emWave technologies into the Gottman Institute and recently successfully introduced the emWave into the Boystown and Girlstown orphanages in South Korea. Ray has developed the emWave Approach to Better Relationships and continues his work with couples in his private practice and teaching and presenting at workshops and conferences.

Walter CieckoWalter Ciecko Walter J. (Walt ) Ciecko, PhD, is a licensed psychologist in private practice in Wilmington Delaware. Walt is director of the Delaware Relationship Center. He is certified by Imago Relationships International as an advanced clinician, individual and couple workshop presenter and consultant. Walt is certified as a Marriage and Family Therapist, Biofeedback Clinician, EMDR Therapist, Sport Psychologist and as a workshop presenter of Hot Monogamy. He presents workshops to individuals, couples, groups, conferences, business and industry, Clinically, Walt is interested in relationship development and enhancement, gender issues, enhanced self-regulation emotionally and physiologically, trauma-recovery and peak performance training. Personally, individuals experience him as thoughtful, knowledgeable, compassionate and caring with an easy going style.


BOS13: Applied Psychophysiology of Asthma...
BOS13: Applied Psychophysiology of Asthma: Emotions, Placebos, and Airway Response

Friday, March 15, 2013
1:30 PM to 3:00 PM

Dysfunctional breathing and the upper airways (Frederick Wamboldt): Those scary things that go bump in your throat: This presentation will review the structure and function of the upper airway in health, discuss physiological and psychological pathways resulting in dysfunction and clinical symptoms, and explore frontiers for therapy and research. Placebo, expectations and asthma. (Charles Irvin, PhD): Placebos and suggestion procedures have large effects on both symptoms and pulmonary function in asthma. This presentation will review this literature and discuss its implications for treatment and research. Emotional factors in asthma (Paul Lehrer, PhD). Emotional factors affect pulmonary function, symptoms, effectiveness of asthma self-management, and response to treatment. This literature will be reviewed, along with implications for applied psychophysiology.

Speakers:

  • Paul Lehrer, PhD, BCB
  • Charles Irvin, PhD
  • Frederick Wamboldt, MD

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand that placebo effects are significant in effecting airways responsiveness and symptom.
  • Understand that enhanced expectations influence medication adherence
  • Understand the structure and function of the upper airway in health
  • Understand the physiological and psychological pathways resulting in dysfunction and clinical symptoms
  • Understand the relationship betweene emotional factors and the physiology and symptoms of asthma

Who Should Attend:
All applied psychophysiology clinicians who work with asthma or are interested in working with asthma patients, either for research or clinical practice.

Level: All

Paul LehrerPaul Lehrer Dr. Lehrer is a leading applied psychophysiology researcher and clinician. he has done research on the psychophysiology of asthma for over thirty years, and has published numerous papers and book chapters on the topic. He is past president of AAPB and former board member of BCIA, He is a licensed clinical psychologist, and has utilized applied psychophysiology in his practice for over 40 years.

Charles IrvinCharles Irvin Dr. Irvin's scientific career has focused on understanding the mechanisms of airways dysfunction of the patient with asthma. Using a multidisciplinary approach including: cell and molecular biology, animal models and systems, transgenics, physiology, imaging and clinical studies, he and his colleagues are attempting to understand the pathophysiological basis of asthma in order to both better diagnose and treat asthma patients. Dr. Irvin has been continuously funded by NIH since 1976 and is currently the PI of an ALA-ACRC Center, R01, U13, COBRE and a T32 training grants from the NIH Dr. Irvin has served on numerous grant review panels including NIH, AHA and ALA and is currently on a study section for the NIH and was the chairman of an ALA grant review committee. He is a member of the European Respiratory Society, American Physiological Society, the American Thoracic Society and the Society of Experimental Medicine and Biology. He has served on the Board of Directors of the ATS. He has been awarded the Joe Rodarte Distinguished Science Award by the ATS and was awarded the UVM University Scholar Award in 2007.

Frederick WamboldtFrederick Wamboldt Frederick Wamboldt's clinical practice is within the Division of Psychosocial Medicine at National Jewish Health where he specializes in patient-centered, family-friendly psychosocial interventions for those suffering from chronic cardiopulmonary illness. Dr Wamboldt is Co-Director of the Center for Health Promotion at National Jewish Health were he leads a very active research program with three major areas of emphasis, all of which examine individual, family and/or social processes in the context of stress, typically chronic cardiopulmonary illness. First are observational and interventional studies examining biopsychosocial factors influencing treatment adherence and outcomes in patients and families dealing with chronic cardiopulmonary illness. Second are community-based projects, in particular studies aiming to reduce health disparities within low-income, racial/ethnic minority, and/or isolated rural communities. Third are projects evaluating systems change within healthcare practices as well as related public health policy.


BOS14: Cardiopulmonary Anatomy and Physiology for the Biofeedback Practitioner

Friday, March 15, 2013
1:30 PM to 3:00 PM

This session will provide a brief review of the anatomy and physiology of the cardiac and respiratory system particularly as they relate to biofeedback practice. Gas exchange as it pertains to capnometry will be discussed. Conditions which affect CO2 exchange and may affect capnometry results will be delineated . Cardiac anatomy and physiology will be presented with emphasis on cardiac electrical conduction and EKGs as they relate to heart rate variability training. Conditions which alter the ability to perform HRV training will be discussed.

Speaker:

  • Jan Newman, MD, MA, FACS, ABIHM

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to describe the chambers of the heart and what their functions are.
  • Participants will be able to describe the electrical conduction system of the heart and how each part of the EKG reflects it function.
  • Participants will be able to identify EKG patterns appropriate for HRV biofeedback and patterns that warrant referral to physicians.
  • Participants will identify the components of the pulmonary system, how gas exchange occurs and how end tidal CO2 training effects gas exchange. li>

Who Should Attend:
This session will be a brief review for seasoned practioners and an introduction for those unfamiliar with the cardiopulmonary anatomy and physiology and capnometry and HRV biofeedback.

Level: All


Jan NewmanJan Newman Dr. Jan B. Newman received her MD from SUNY Downstate Medical Center, surgical training at UTMB Galveston and the University of Vermont. She is a fellow of the American College of Surgeons and board certified in Integrative and Holistic Medicine. She is currently practicing preventative medicine. She has studied and practiced meditation, Yoga, Buddhism and biofeedback in the U.S and in India for over 30 years. She received her Master's degree in Integrative Arts and Education. She is dedicated to the integration of sound medical practice with scientifically based multimodality stress reduction for disease mitigation and prevention. She is a nationally requested speaker and has presented on topics including Stress: Manifestations, Mechanisms, and Management, Spirituality and Health, the Relationship of Stress and Disease, Oxytocin the Anti-stress Hormone, Cardiopulmonary Anatomy and Physiology and the response of the Cardiopulmonary System to Stress.


BOS15: Contemporary Management of Fibromyalgia: A Panel Discussion

Friday, March 15, 2013
1:30 PM to 3:00 PM

Dr. Bennett will provide learners with an overview of the contemporary management of fibromyalgia. This will include newly published diagnostic options, history, physical exam and pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatments. Dr. Jones will then detail evidence-based options for prescribing exercise in fibromyalgia and explore pragmatic options to enhance the likelihood that patients will adopt and maintain a program of exercise.

Speakers:

  • Kim Dupree Jones, PhD
  • Robert M. Bennett, MD, FRCP, FACP, MACR
  • Richard Gevirtz, PhD, BCB

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain the physiologic bases for modifying the exercise prescription in fibromyalgia
  • Compare and contrast the benefits of various exercise modalities in fibromyalgia
  • List practical modifications for btoh exercise and activities of daily living in fibromyalgia
  • Describe predictors of adoption and maintenance of non-pharmacologic treatments in fibromyalgia

Who Should Attend:
Health care providers, scientists and professionals who interact with persons with chronic pain

Level: All

Kim Dupree JonesKim Dupree Jones Dr. Kim Dupree Jones is an associate professor in the School of Nursing at Oregon Health & Science University. She is an investigator on over eight million dollars of research funding in fibromyalgia from the National Institutes of Health, foundations and industry. Her area of expertise is prescribing exercise in fibromyalgia. She is currently the president of the Fibromyalgia Information Foundation (www.myalgia.com), a non-profit organization whose aim for the past three decades has been to disseminate scientifically sound fibromyalgia data. She maintains an active fibromyalgia clinical practice at The Frida Center for Fibromyalgia in Portland, OR.

Robert M. BennettRobert M. Bennett Dr. Bennett is Professor of Medicine and Nursing at Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU). He is Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology, and was Chairman of the Division of Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases at OHSU for 24 years (1976-2000). Dr. Bennett is a past President of the International Myopain Society and the American College of Rheumatology Western Region. He has been actively involved in fibromyalgia research since 1980, with over 500 articles, abstracts and book chapters. He holds 3 US patents (5,378,686, 5,965,520, and 7,132,399) for discoveries regarding growth hormone and the molecular characterization of cell surface DNA receptors. Dr. Bennett founded the Fibromyalgia Information Foundation (FIF) in 1995 and continues as their executive director (www.myalgia.com). In 2007 he was elected a Master of the American College of Rheumatology, in recognition of his contributions to rheumatology research and teaching.

Richard GevirtzRichard Gevirtz Dr. Richard Gevirtz is a Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the California School of Professional Psychology at Alliant International University in San Diego. His research and practice in recent years has focused on psychophysiological mechanisms and treatment of disorders affected by the autonomic nervous system, such as, IBS, Non-Cardiac Chest Pain, TMD, Headache, and other muscle pain syndromes. He is one of the first researchers and clinicians to explore heart rate variability biofeedback. He has presented workshops on these topics throughout the world over the last 15 years. Dr. Gevirtz is the author of numerous peer reviewed articles and chapters. He has been the chair of Biofeedback Certification Institute of America and was the president of the Association of Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback. He was honored with the AAPB Distinguished Scientist Award in 2008 and the Sheila Adler Service award in 2005. For the past several years he has been on the editorial board of Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback, and was named in 2005 as Associate Editor. .


Networking Break & Posters Available for Viewing in the Exhibit Hall

Friday, March 15, 2013
3:00 PM to 3:30 PM



BOS16: Stress Management for College Students
BOS16: Stress Management for College Students: Developing Health Habits to Build a Healthy Life

Friday, March 15, 2013
3:30 PM to 4:30 PM

Stress management and biofeedback have been show to significantly improve both mental and physical health. Instead of focusing on disease processes, the purpose of this presentation is to discuss using stress management and biofeedback as primary prevention techniques in healthy populations to prevent or delay the onset of disease. College age is an ideal time for people to develop healthy lifestyle habits and to learn effective stress reduction techniques as they begin establishing their adult lives. This presentation will review current research that is being conducted to intervene at early life stages with the intention of preventing chronic disease processes such as cardiovascular disease. A number of biofeedback techniques and stress management strategies will be presented in the context of developing a healthy lifestyle and building a foundation for a long, healthy life.

Speakers:

  • Patrick Steffen, PhD
  • Barbara Morrell, PhD
  • Tracy Brown, BS
  • Loren Brown, BS

Learning Objectives:

  • LEARNING OBJECTIVES PENDING - 11/26/2012

Who Should Attend:
All

Level: All

Patrick SteffenPatrick Steffen Patrick Steffen's broad research interests lie in the areas of health psychology and behavioral medicine, with specific interests in culture, spirituality, and health. He is particularly interested in the Hispanic Paradox and how disadvantaged groups display resiliency and positive adaptation in spite of significant stressors. He has authored and co-authored articles in Psychosomatic Medicine, Annals of Behavioral Medicine, Journal of Behavioral Medicine, American Journal of Hypertension, Ethnicity and Disease, and Mental Health, Religion, and Culture; and co-authored chapters in the Oxford Handbook of Health Psychology and the Handbook of Primary Care Psychology. Dr. Steffen is currently an associate professor and associate director of clinical training in the Brigham Young University clinical psychology program. Before coming to BYU, Steffen was a postdoctoral research fellow in cardiovascular behavioral medicine at Duke University Medical Center. He received his PhD and master's degrees at the University of Miami in clinical health psychology, and a bachelor's degree in psychology with minors in statistics and philosophy from Brigham Young University.

Tracy BrownTracy Brown Tracy Brown is a graduate student at BYU with interests in clinical health psychology and using biofeedback as adjunct treatment in psychotherapy.

Barbara MorrellBarbara Morrell BIOGRAPHY PENDING - 1/2/2013

Loren BrownLoren Brown BIOGRAPHY PENDING - 2/4/2013


BOS17:Psychophysiological Assessment of Chronic Pain

Friday, March 15, 2013
3:30 PM to 4:30 PM

Psychophysiological assessment techniques for determining the causes of chronic pain and determining the intervention most likely to succeed have become progressively better worked out and substantiated though research in recent years. Psychophysiological assessments provide data not available through other techniques which provide crucial information needed for accurate determination of underlying causes of pain. Many of these techniques will be discussed in sufficient detail that attendees can decide whether to learn to apply them.

Speaker:

  • Richard A. Sherman, PhD, BCB, BCB-PMD

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will learn enough about psychophysiological assessment techniques to know whether they want to learn enough details to apply them.
  • Participants will learn how to perform a psychophysiological assessment of tension and migraine headaches.
  • Participants will learn how to perform a psychophysiological assessment of low back pain.

Who Should Attend:
Anybody working with patients having pain.

Level: All

Richard ShermanRichard Sherman Dr. Sherman's areas of interest spanning over thirty years of teaching, research, and clinical work in psychophysiology (Ph.D. from New York University) include elucidating mechanisms and treatments for phantom limb pain, determining the effectiveness of pulsed electromagnetic fields for treatment of migraine headaches, and describing temporal relationships between changes in muscle tension and pain. He is incoming president of the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback, Director of the Behavioral Medicine Research and Training Foundation and Dean of the Clinical Psychophysiology Doctoral Program at the University of Natural Medicine. He has written over 130 articles and books related to pain and behavioral medicine. His most recent book is "pain assessment and intervention from a psychophysiological perspective" AAPB, 2012. His major emphasis is providing distance based education programs for clinicians wishing to add behavioral medicine techniques to their practices.


BOS18: EEG and Dimensions of Experience in First-Person Science

Friday, March 15, 2013
3:30 PM to 4:30 PM

This presentation proposes a long-range program of research on the relationship of human subjective experience to its physiological and environmental concomitants. Subjective experience has been a long debated topic, and attempts to rule it out of bounds of scientific inquiry have not been totally successful. Among the reasons for the failure of the approach was disagreement among different observers in the verbal reports of their introspections, presumably of the same object of observation. However the process of introspection itself, apart from the reporting thereof, is the observing of events internal to the observer. Dreams, imagery, pains, hopes, thoughts and feelings are still present, for all their privacy, waiting to be comprehended more adequately in a framework of all scientific knowledge. Since the activity being observed is private to the observer, we refer to this as first person observation, and when reported verbally is commonly termed subjective report, and sometimes non-falsifiable. We will explore future possibilities integrating the physical with the mental, to advance first-person science into the 21st century.

Speakers:

  • Thomas Collura, PhD, BCN
  • Joe Kamiya, PhD
  • Jon Frederick, PhD, BCN

Learning Objectives:

  • Summarize the technical foundations of Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography of the brain
  • Recognize LORETA and sLORETA images and interpret the brain locations indicated
  • Utilize LORETA and sLORETA in assessment of brain function
  • Utilize LORETA and sLORETA in neurofeedback

Who Should Attend:
Neurofeedback practitioners and researchers

Level: Intermediate

Thomas ColluraThomas Collura Dr. Collura is currently president of BrainMaster Technologies, Inc., and a graduate student in Mental Health Counseling at Walden University, Minneapolis, MN. He received the Ph.D. in 1978 in Biomedical Engineering from Case Western Reserve University for research on visual and auditory evoked potentials and attention. He served for 8 years on the staff of the Department of Neurology, Cleveland, Clinic, developing computerized EEG monitoring and mapping systems. He is the founder of BrainMaster Technologies, Bedford, OH, a developer of EEG and neurofeedback systems. He has over 20 peer reviewed papers and book chapters in the areas of EEG, evoked potentials, and neurofeedback. He is a past president of the ISNR, and a past president of the neurofeedback division of the AAPB. He recently chaired the IEEE standards effort on Recommended Practice for Neurofeedback Systems, whose standard was approved in 2012.

Joe KamiyaJoe Kamiya Joe Kamiya In 1958, Joe Kamiya, a psychologist teaching at the University of Chicago, began experiments on brain wave frequencies. Kamiya attached a sensing electrode to the left side of the back of the subjects's head--the left occiput, where alpha brain waves are move evident. When a tone sounded, the subject was to guess whether he was in alpha. Kamiya was able to tell if the subject's guess was correct from the EEG (electroencephalograph) readings and answered "correct" or "wrong." The first subject Kamiya worked with, Richard Bach, reported correctly 65% on the second day of testing, and on the fourth day was able to report correctly 100% of the time. In a second experiment, the subject was able to enter the alpha state or not enter the state on a specific cue. It was thus established that people could control brain waves which had been thought to be involuntary states. This was the beginning of brain wave biofeedback. Psychology Today did an article on Kamiya in 1968 and the field exploded.

Jon FrederickJon Frederick Jon Frederick PhD earned his degree in experimental psychology in Joel Lubar's lab at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. He has worked as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center-Houston and the University of Minnesota, researching topics such as structural MRI in autism, evoked potentials in ADHD, and the efficacy of neurofeedback for dementia. His current research focuses on physical properties that make differences in EEG signals more or less discriminable by human subjects. The EEG state discrimination paradigm may provide a novel window on mind-brain interactions, and a powerful experimental model of, and clinical adjunct to, standard biofeedback methods. He has authored or co-authored 43 scientific publications and conference presentations.


BCIAETHICS: BCIA Ethics Presentation
BCIA Ethics Presentation: Professional Ethics and Standards for Biofeedback and Neurofeedback: An Overview

Friday, March 15, 2013
3:30 PM to 4:30 PM

This session will review legal and ethical responsibilities of biofeedback and neurofeedback practitioners. The biofeedback professional is governed in clinical practice by state regulations under the relevant licensing act, professional codes of ethics for his or her home profession, and the Professional Standards and Ethical Principles of Biofeedback (5th rev.) of the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance (BCIA). Violation of such guidelines, even when unintended, invites the risk of lawsuit, criminal prosecution, financial penalties, loss of licensure, and expensive and stressful legal and administrative reviews. The presenter will discuss relevant guidelines governing: entry level competence; scope of practice; the delivery of experimental or non-documented therapies; the informed consent process; and questions of touch, privacy, and respect. The presenter will place emphasis on the imperative to maintain a positive treatment relationship, eliciting rapport and trust. The therapeutic relationship, along with knowledge of current standards of practice and adherence to professional guidelines, minimize the risk of misunderstanding and litigation.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will become familiar with the Professional Standards and Ethical Principles of Biofeedback, published by BCIA, and their interpretation for decisions in biofeedback practice.
  • Attendees will understand how to navigate the conflicting jurisdictions of state laws and regulations, professional codes of conduct, BCIA guidelines, and federal regulations.
  • Attendees will review and discuss practice standards governing entry level competence and scope of practice.
  • Attendees will develop an approach to educate patients about treatment options, providing cautions about potential adverse effects, and guiding patients toward an informed consent for specific therapies and treatment plan.

Who Should Attend:
Practitioners in biofeedback and neurofeedback.

Level:
All


Donald MossDonald Moss Donald Moss, Ph.D., is Chair of the School of Mind-Body Medicine, at Saybrook University in San Francisco. He is past-president of APA Division 30 (hypnosis), past-president of the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback, treasurer for the Society of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis, a SCEH delegate to the International Society for Hypnosis, a Board member of BCIA, and an advisory board member for the International Network for Integrative Mental Health. He is co-author of Pathways to Illness, Pathways to Health (Springer, 2013), editor of Handbook of Mind-Body Medicine for Primary Care (Sage Publications, 2003) and Humanistic and Transpersonal Psychology (Greenwood Press, 1998), and of Biofeedback Magazine, and consulting editor for other journals. He has published over 50 articles and chapters on consciousness, psychophysiology, spirituality in health, and integrative medicine. He operates a clinic in Michigan and provides biofeedback and other mind-body services for anxiety, PTSD, functional medical problems, and chronic pain.


KEY3: Keynote Address: Chronic Stress, Cell Aging, and Psychobiological Resilien
by Kirstin Aschbacher, PhD

Friday, March 15, 2013
4:45 PM to 5:45 PM

Chronic Stress, Cell Aging, and Psychobiological Resilience

Under times of chronic psychological stress people are said to have Aged before your eyes. Emerging scientific research is illuminating how stress is transduced into biochemical signaling cascades that can accelerate immune system aging and accumulation of oxidative damage. On the psychological side, research increasingly highlights the role that maintaining positive affect under stress, staying mindful and present-focused, and decreasing threat sensitivity appear to play in facilitating psychobiological resilience. Exciting and novel applications of complexity theory are helping understand how stress and aging drive key bodily systems out of balance. As we age, there is not only a loss of flexibility within biological systems that respond to and help us cope with stress, but there is also an erosion of the dynamic communication between systems. The presentation will provide an overview of these psychological and biological mechanisms, highlighting cutting-edge developments in the field and their potential translational applications.

About Dr. Aschbacher:
Dr. Aschbacher investigates how chronic stress exposure and emotion-regulation during stress affect the autonomic nervous system, immune system, and the bodys endogenous healing mechanisms. Her particular interest has been in identifying novel potential intervention targets to increase psychobiological resilience. Dr. Aschbacher conceptualizes the psychological and biological aspects of her work, not merely as separate phenomena to be correlated, but as an integrated, bidirectional and dynamic brain-body system. For example, she finds that psychological states associated with greater positive affect tend to be associated with an altered pattern of dynamic interactions between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems during stress, which is associated with lower levels of markers of inflammation, oxidative stress and metabolic risk.



Presidential and Poster Reception

Friday, March 15, 2013
5:45 PM to 7:00 PM

Join AAPB President, Dr. Jeff Bolek, for an evening of networking while viewing the AAPB poster presentations.


BCIACERT: BCIA Certification Exam

Friday, March 15, 2013
6:00 PM to 9:00 PM

This 3-hour time slot is reserved for all pre-approved candidates wishing to sit for their certification exams in biofeedback, neurofeedback or pelvic muscle dysfunction. Additionally, one may take their human anatomy/physiology exam as part of the "Study on Your Own" option offered by BCIA. Please be sure that you have filed your application, had it approved, and have submitted your exam registration form at least 1 week prior to the exam. Please contact info@bcia.org for more information or to check on your status. If this exam site does not work well for you, please remember there are other scheduled dates and as well BCIA offers a special exam option that uses a university or public library proctor to suit your own schedule and geography.


SEC01: ISMA-USA Stress Management Section Meeting
Special presentation by Kirstin Aschbacher, PhD; Jan Newman, MD, MA, FACS, ABIHM and Joseph Quinn

Friday, March 15, 2013
7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

The purpose of the ISMA-USA Stress Management Section is to promote scientific and clinical activities in the application areas of stress management for treating psychological and physical symptoms and management of stress related disorders.

Feature Presenters:

  • Kirstin Aschbacher, PhD


SEC08: Neurofeedback Division Meeting
Special presentation by Siegfried Othmer, PhD, BCN

Friday, March 15, 2013
7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

Neurofeedback Division Meeting
Special presentation by Siegfried Othmer, PhD, BCN

Membership is open to members of AAPB who are interested in research and practice in neurofeedback (EEG biofeedback). We also encourage those who are not currently active in this area to join, as a way to learn about his increasingly important and growing area. The division sponsors many activities at the AAPB Annual Meeting, including key speakers and workshops. The Neurofeedback Division Newsletter includes articles of broad interest including clinical and technical interviews, topics including insurance, ethics, and medicolegal issues, and current products, systems, and approaches. Articles for the Biofeedback Newsmagazine are also submitted by division members.

Benefits of membership include newsletters and list servs, special programs and a dinner at the annual meeting, web-listing opportunities, and access to the AAPB web site's member's only area.

*Sustaining Member benefits include recognition in the Neurofeedback Newsletter, Certificate showing support of Division, and free web link in Member's Only Section of website.

Siegfried OthmerSiegfried Othmer Siegfried Othmer received his Ph.D. in physics at Cornell University in 1970. He has been active in the development of EEG neurofeedback for some twenty-eight years, along with his wife Susan. After an initial focus on ADHD children, their work has increasingly encompassed the more serious afflictions such as the autism spectrum, Bipolar Disorder, Tourette Syndrome, trauma conditions (PTSD and TBI), developmental delay, and the problem of addiction. An additional focus has been on educational performance in children and optimum performance in adults. Dr. Othmer has been active in all aspects of the field: instrumentation development, professional training, clinical service delivery, clinical research, and publication in both professional and popular media. The Othmers have also built a large practitioner network that now extends to many countries around the world. They have taught neurofeedback professionals in eleven countries.


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