2017 AAPB Annual Meeting


Friday Breakout Sessions

BOS01: The Current State of Biofeedback in Children

Friday, April 13, 2018
8:00 AM to 9:00 AM

Title: The Current State of Biofeedback in Children

This symposium will address the current state of biofeedback as it is applied to children. We will provide 3 separate talks regarding the history and concepts related to biofeedback, the application of biofeedback in pediatrics, and the current evidence supporting biofeedback for various conditions. First, Dr. Brannon will review the concepts and technology embedded in biofeedback, including an introduction of biofeedback to treat children. Data will also be discussed regarding the exponential growth of technological equipment for physiological monitoring and audio-visual interfacing with children. Second, Ms. Fahrenkamp will detail how biofeedback can be applied and studied in cases to initially examine its effectiveness. Using a case series design, this study examined changes in HRV and respiration rate for four adolescents with chronic pain. Adolescents demonstrate improved cardiopulmonary functioning across sessions during active training, improved functioning without training, and improved functioning without active feedback suggesting improved self-regulation. Third, Ms. Darling will present data from a recent meta-analysis on biofeedback in children, detailing the state of the evidence supporting biofeedback for various conditions. Finally, Dr. Benore will chair this symposium and serve as the discussant, addressing the future of biofeedback research and practice in children in light of the information presented above. This symposium neatly aligns with the theme of the conference, as we will challenge attendees to critically consider how they are currently using biofeedback and how they can improve the evidence base in their clinical care.

Speaker:

  • Ethan Benore, PhD, BCB, ABPP
  • Erin Brannon, PhD, Cleveland Clinic
  • Amy Fahrenkamp, MS, Nationwide Children's Hospital
  • Katy Darling, MS, Kent State University

Learning Objectives:

  • Critically examine technology used for self-regulation for the best interest of the child
  • Design a case study to examine their own of biofeedback in pediatrics
  • Critique the current clinical research supporting biofeedback for children
  • Describe the steps necessary to further validate biofeedback as an effective intervention for children

Who Should Attend: Individuals practicing biofeedback with children

Level: Introductory

CEUs: 1

Guidelines Applied in Practice: Practice-based Learning and Improvement - Our hope is that this session educates participants on the current state of science of pediatric biofeedback, highlighting the specific areas to target in future research to expand the knowledge base. Along this line, we hope to demonstrate how clinicians practicing biofeedback can systematically collect data and share the results to further this knowledge base.


Ethan BenoreEthan Benore Dr. Benore is a pediatric psychologist at the Cleveland Clinic. He has been in practice for over 12 years. He works primarily in the pediatric pain rehabilitation program as well as providing interventions for headache disorders and sleep disorders. He is board certified in both biofeedback and clinical child and adolescent psychology. He has over 10 years of experience with biofeedback, and currently teaches on and mentors on the discipline. He directs the pediatric pain psychology fellowship program. He is also a current member of the Board of AAPB.


BOS02: Current and Future Applications of Brain-Computer Interfaces

Friday, April 13, 2018
8:00 AM to 9:00 AM

Title:Current and Future Applications of Brain-Computer Interfaces

Brain-computer Interfaces (BCIs) are realized with non-invasive EEG sensors and are used for many different applications: (i) stroke rehabilitation, (ii) assessment of brain functions of patients with disorders of consciousness or (iii) communication. These BCIs use either the event-related desynchronization (ERD) of the sensorimotor cortex, steady-state visual evoked potentials or evoked potentials like the P300 as control signal. In the talk BCI principles, necessary technology and guidelines for usage in hospitals, therapy centers and research will be given. The talk will compare results from EEG with invasive technology for avatar control.

Speaker:

  • Christoph Guger, PhD, Owner, g. tec

  • Learning Objectives:
    • Principles of BCI control?
    • Which EEG signal is used for communication?
    • Which EEG signal is used for motor rehabilitation?
    • Which EEG signals are used for brain assessment?
    • Can ALS/DOC patients communicate with BCIs?

    Who Should Attend: Neurologists, physio-therapists, occupational-therapists, researchers, BCI developers

    Level: Advanced

    CEUs: 1

    Guidelines Applied in Practice: Patient Care, Medical Knowledge - Neurotechnology usage for DOC assessment and communication, stroke rehabilitation concept and control applications.



    BOS03: Presidential Symposium on the Clinical Efficacy of Biofeedback...

    Friday, April 13, 2018
    8:00 AM to 9:00 AM

    Title:Presidential Symposium on the Clinical Efficacy of Biofeedback and Neurofeedback

    This symposium critically evaluates the efficacy of biofeedback and neurofeedback interventions to treat ADHD, chronic pain, diabetes mellitus, irritable bowel syndrome, and Raynauds Phenomenon, and promote resilience. The presenters will describe best practices for each of six applications.

    Speaker:

    • Moderator: Dr. Paul Lehrer
    • Mark V. Versella, Jr.
    • Carolyn Trasko
    • Khushbu Shah
    • Karenjot Kaur, PhD, Rutgers University, Yeshiva University
    • Tara Austin, BA and Master of Music, MS Clinical Psychology candidate, Brigham Young University
    • Ashlie Bell

    Learning Objectives:

    • Attendees will be able to critically evaluate the efficacy of neurofeedback for the treatment of ADHD
    • Attendees will be able to critically evaluate the efficacy of biofeedback for the treatment of Raynauds Phenomenon
    • Attendees will be able to critically evaluate the efficacy of biofeedback for the treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome
    • Attendees will be able to critically evaluate the efficacy of biofeedback for the treatment of chronic pain
    • Attendees will be able to critically evaluate the efficacy of HRV biofeedback to improve resilience

    Who Should Attend:
    This symposium is intended for professionals who treat ADHD, chronic pain, diabetes mellitus, irritable bowel syndrome, and Raynauds Phenomenon, and who train clients to increase resilience.

    Level: Introductory

    Guidelines Applied in Practice: Patient Care - The presentations will identify evidence-based interventions that attendees may incorporate in their practice.

    Paul LehrerPaul Lehrer Dr. Paul Lehrer is professor of psychiatry at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey - Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. He has published over 100 papers, mostly in the field of applied psychophysiology, and is senior editor of the book Principles and Practice of Stress Management, the third edition of which was released last year. He extensively uses applied psychophysiology in his medical school practice of clinical psychology. For the past 15 years his research has primarily focused on heart rate variability and ways to modify it. A recipient of AAPB's Distinguished Scientist Award, he serves as associate editor of Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback and of The International Journal of Stress Management, and has served as president of the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback and the International Society for Advancement of Respiratory Psychophysiology. He currently chairs the International Stress Management Association section of AAPB.

    Tara AustinTara Austin Tara Austin is a doctoral student under Patrick Steffen at Brigham Young University in the clinical psychology department. I have two B.A.s, and a Master of Music degree, and am expecting my MS in Clinical Psychology in August and my doctorate in the same April 2019.

    Karenjot KaurKarenjot Kaur Karenjot Kaur is a graduate of Rutgers University, where she was a Research Assistant with Dr. Paul Lehrer. She is currently attending Yeshiva University's Ferkauf Graduate School, where she is a PhD candidate for Clinical Psychology with a Health Emphasis. She is working as a Research Assistant in a Pediatric Asthma laboratory. Her primary interests are in: asthma research, heart rate variability, medication adherence, biofeedback and its applications as a treatment in clinical settings, and the use of biofeedback in general for anxiety and depression in a wide range of populations. Kaur hopes to simultaneously conduct research and apply her research to clinical care for patients.


    BOS04: Writing Without Fear

    Friday, April 13, 2018
    11:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Title: Writing Without Fear

    The first half of this 90-minute session will aim to reduce the fear--and often procrastination--involved with writing projects. A strategic approach to writing will be presented by acknowledging the cognitive processes involved and techniques needed at each step of a writing project. The traditional outline method and mindmapping will be covered, including how each can be used to advantage. Writer's block and strategies to overcome it will also be discussed. The second half of the session will focus on practical techniques that writers use to enliven their language usage and improve readability and reader engagement.

    Speakers:

  • Susan E. Aiello, BS, DVM, Principal, WordsWorld Consulting
  • Learning Objectives:

    • Explain the cognitive processes involved in approaching and working through a writing project
    • Compare outlining and mind mapping, and how to leverage each technique for a writing project
    • List three techniques to overcome writer's block
    • Describe three writing principles used to enliven language usage and make written communication more engaging and accessible to readers

    Who Should Attend:
    Clinicians and researchers who wish to improve their writing skills

    Level: Intermediate

    Guidelines Applied in Practice: Interpersonal and Communication Skills - Principles and techniques of scientific writing to improve clarity and readability


    BOS05: Using ISF to Maximize Rehabilitation Success in Soldiers Presenting...

    Friday, April 13, 2018
    11:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Title: Using ISF to Maximize Rehabilitation Success in Soldiers Presenting with PTSD

    This workshop will describe Infraslow neurofeedback training with soldiers whose symptoms include expressions of traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), anxiety and depression. This didactic presentation will categorize symptoms and identify biological, medical, social and emotional obstacles. The presenters will review the use of neurofeedback to improve physiological 'calm,' follow through with strategy use and to enhance the effectiveness of interventions.
    Infraslow neurofeedback offers a unique opportunity to intervene at the core source of traumatic stress. ISF has been shown to regulate the autonomic nervous system and facilitate behavioral stabilization of related functions (Lecci et al., 2017) (Smith, 2013; Smith, Collura, Ferrara, & de Vries, 2014). ISF neurofeedback's centrality in regulating the excitability cycle of interoceptive networks positively impacts treatment outcomes.
    Research suggests that PTSD reflects an abnormal adaptation of neurobiological systems to traumatic stress (DiCara, 1974). This response involves systems that control endocrine pathways and brain networks that regulate, among other functions, the fear response. A primary feature of the PTSD client is persistent hyperactivity of the sympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system. This system is impacted by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis: the central coordinator of neuroendocrine stress response. (Daniels, Frewen, McKinnon, & Lanius, 2011; Sherin & Nemeroff, 2011). Ledoux (LeDoux & Pine, 2017) has proposed a "two systems" view of fear and anxiety. One system produces behavioral and physiological responses to threat. The other brain circuit produces the conscious feeling-states of fear and anxiety.
    The physiological response to trauma activation is present despite higher level cognitive reasoning. Muscular and physiological reactions are automatic, leaving the conscious capacity to "catch up later." (Van Der Kolk, 2014) Activation leads to avoidance, thus increasing the client's disability and negatively impacting quality of life. Although psychotherapy is essential in the recovery process, without the ability to regulate the autonomic nervous system and related limbic networks sufficiently to tolerate the process, participation is often limited or unsuccessful.
    By virtue of its ability to support the regulation of the autonomic nervous system/HPA axis (and subsequently the automatic physiological response to trauma), ISF neurofeedback is believed to be a foundational approach to promoting recovery.

    Speakers:

    • Mark Smith, MSW, Clinical Director, Neurofeedback Services of New York
    • Sharie Woelke, BMR, Occupational Therapist, Registered Psychotherapist, Woelke Occupational Therapy and Neurofeedback

    Learning Objectives:

    • learn the use of the qEEG in assessing cocussions
    • learn the relationship between the CNS Questionnaire and the qEEG results
    • learn the relationship between the SCL 90 - R and the qEEG results
    • understand the relationship between age and incidience of concussions

    Who Should Attend:
    Any provider working with, or interested in working with the military trauma population.

    Level: Introductory

    Guidelines Applied in Practice: Patient Care, Practice-based Learning and Improvement -

    • Research indicates that community-based mental health providers are not well prepared to take care of the special needs of military veterans and their families."
    • .not all patients will respond adequately to psychotherapy or evidence-based/first-line pharmacotherapy. Further understanding of the underlying physiological and neurological processes will be helpful in developing new and effective therapies to treat PTSD."
    • "Research also suggests further opportunities for the VA and other health care systems to develop new and innovative ways to overcome barriers to treating veterans with PTSD."

    Addressing the GAP:
    • This session will identify unique components of the military culture and how these may be addressed in context of rehabilitation.
    • The session will identify the physiological underpinnings of trauma symptoms, in order to inform and guide intervention.
    • The presenters propose that infra-slow neurofeedback is a new, innovative and effective method of overcoming barriers to treating veterans with PTSD.
    "


    Mark SmithMark Smith Mark Smith is a licensed social worker with a degree from the University of California. Mark practices neurotherapy in Manhattan. His clinical approach combines brain mapping, symptom based neurofeedback, and biofeedback. Mark added Z-Score training in search of a better way to train connectivity. He was the first clinician to use live Z-Score training, and to publish clinical results using that approach. That fortuitous event led to better clinical results and the teaching of Z-Score neurofeedback to scores of clinicians. He continues to lead the profession in his development and use of Live Z-Score training combined with conventional, Live sLORETA, and other emerging approaches. He is a BCIA certified neurofeedback practitioner, and has published on the use of clinical neurofeedback.


    BOS06: Psychophysiological and Psychometric Assessment Before, During and...

    Friday, April 13, 2018
    11:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Title:Psychophysiological and Psychometric Assessment Before, During and After Intensive Leadership Development

    Speakers:

    • Wesley E Sime, PhD, MPH, Univ Nebraska Faculty Emeritus
    • Al Ringleb, PhD, Lawyer, CIMBA

    In this era of "big data," large databases integrating diverse data sources including psychometric and psychophysiological measures can be used as part of a program of personal and professional development. But it is very rare to find such a large database used to assist in developing and implementing coaching intervention strategies in a business context. Built upon a highly sophisticated IT infrastructure across computer, web, and mobile environments, the CIMBA personal development system was specifically designed to collect and allow for the integrative analyses of psychometric (NEO Five-factor, FIRO-B, MESCEIT, and others), hormonal (cortisol, testosterone, dHEA), and psychophysiological (HRV, EEG, Skin Conductance) data. In its primary function as an assessment vehicle, HRV data collection is undertaken through the use of wireless technology, monitoring up to 44 individuals simultaneously and continuously in a highly experiential environment over a systematic and structured two-and-one-half-day time period. Data integration allows for the statistical analyses of information gathered from both self-report as well as objective psychophysiological data taken under such experiential test conditions, generating a variety of insights directly and indirectly affecting the personal development experience. The database, developed from 1,000+ executive participants (complete; more than 2,000 additional partial) over the course of a 10-year time period, has allowed CIMBA to observe, for example, a significant variance between psychometric instruments that arguably measure outlook, positivity, empathy, resilience, and self-regulation, skills relevant to the effective practices of followership, leadership, and management. To the extent a coach relies on a single self-report assessment, sustainable behavior modification becomes a matter of chance without more; the data clearly reflect the need for a broader range of assessment input into the development resource allocation decision, with greater emphasis on the concerted use of hormonal and psychophysiological data generated in experiential environments. Sensitive to common big data problems (e.g., overenthusiasm for suggestive correlations and apophenia), a recent analysis of graduates from the program all employed at a single company showed lower rates of turnover, consistently higher performance ratings, and higher rates of promotion relative to hires who had not attended the program but otherwise were statistically similar (age, gender, degree, time of graduation, school, etc.) The results are indicative of improved social interactive skills reflective of the use of the richer and more objective data flowing from such personal performance measurement technology and their impact on social decision-making in a business context (e.g., managing conflict, building personal networks, situational adaptability, building effective teams, and managing social ambiguity). Given that these skills are largely considered to be low in average skill level in the general population and some of the most difficult to develop using traditional (content-based) training techniques, the results demonstrate clear, cost-effective benefits to personal development coaches and to their coachees, and particularly to the companies that employee them.

    Learning Objectives:

    • This workshop is designed to help you observe how basic psychometric and psychophysiological measures can be used as part of a program of personal and professional development
    • This workshop is designed to help you learn to utilize integrative analyses of psychometric (NEO Five-factor, FIRO-B, MESCEIT, and others), hormonal (cortisol, testosterone, dHEA), and psychophysiological (HRV, EEG, Skin Conductance) data. In its primary function as an assessment vehicle, HRV data collection is undertaken through the use of wireless technology, monitoring up to 44 individuals simultaneously and continuously in a highly experiential environment over a systematic and structured two-and-one-half-day time period
    • This workshop is designed to help you learn to utilize psychometric instruments that arguably measure outlook, positivity, empathy, resilience, and self-regulation, skills relevant to the effective practices of followership, leadership, and management
    • This workshop is designed to help you observe how to make improved social interactive skills reflective of the use of the richer and more objective data flowing from such personal performance measurement technology and their impact on social decision-making in a business context (e.g., managing conflict, building personal networks, situational adaptability, building effective teams, and managing social ambiguity
    • This workshop is designed to help you learn to utilize some of the most difficult strategies to develop traditional (content-based) training techniques for clear, cost-effective benefits to personal development coaches

    Who Should Attend:
    Any and all

    Level: Intermediate

    Guidelines Applied in Practice: Interpersonal and Communication Skills - To the extent a coach or therapist relies on a single self-report assessment, sustainable behavior modification becomes a matter of chance without more; the data clearly reflect the need for a broader range of assessment input into the development resource allocation decision, with greater emphasis on the concerted use of hormonal and psychophysiological data generated in experiential environments to know oneself and to lead others. Seeking to develop improved social interactive skills reflective of the use of the richer and more objective data flowing from such personal performance measurement technology and their impact on social decision-making in a business context (e.g., managing conflict, building personal networks, situational adaptability, building effective teams, and managing social ambiguity

    Wesley SimeWesley Sime Until recently, Dr. Sime was in private practice as a Health Psychologist at First Step Wellness Program in Lincoln, NE. Prior to 2004 he was a professor in Health & Human Performance at University of Nebraska and previously Director of the Stress Physiology Laboratory & Research Associate at the Cardiovascular Center of the University of Nebraska Medical Center. He was a founding member of BCIA (and served as Chair) as well as one of the founding members of the International Stress Management Association. Dr. Sime was a Co-Principle Investigation on a major research Grant through the National Institute of Occupational Health and Safety titled, "Physiological and psychological assessments of Occupational Stress and Strain in 1000 Workers". Wes worked on the development of "emotional stress testing" while expanding his knowledge of tension control using EMG biofeedback. Wes participated in the Multi-Center National Research Study on Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial (MRFIT), NIH funded study on the testing the efficacy of reducing coronary risk factors by diet, exercise, blood pressure control and management of type A personality factors. This experience with the psychosocial element of coronary risk led him to characterize his primary research interest as stress physiology. His subsequent Ph.D. dissertation on the effect of EMG biofeedback and relaxation training on awareness of muscle tension was published in the journal Psychophysiology and started him on the path toward more psychology research.


    BOS07: Concussion Panel Discussion 1

    Friday, April 13, 2018
    11:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Title:Concussion Panel Discussion 1

    Description 1: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) is a recently identified neurodegenerative condition which has been found in many subjects who sustained multiple concussions. It is usually manifesting as a progressive memory and cognitive decline associated with multiple behavioral problems including depression, anxiety and poor anger control. The accumulation of hyper-phosphorylated Tau protein was found in the brains during autopsy in addition to atrophy and other degenerative changes. The accumulation of this protein is considered as a possible cause of neurological decline of patients suffering from this condition. Unfortunately, the diagnosis of CTE can be only made post mortem. Since there is no definitive approved marker which could be used to diagnose CTE in vivo the possible CTE diagnosis can be suspected based on neuropsychological and neurological examinations. As we know currently there is no effective therapy of CTE except symptomatic treatment. Neurofeedback has been shown to be effective therapy in many patients suffering from concussions, ADD, depression, anxiety and other behavioral problems. In addition, reports indicate that neurofeedback can also be beneficial for individuals suffering from cognitive problems and dementia. Therefore, we hypothesize that neurofeedback may also be effective in amelioration of the symptoms in CTE. In addition, since neurofeedback was shown to be also neuro-plastic it may show propensity in slowing down of progression of CTE. My clinic has been used as one of designated centers for evaluation of former football players with prior concussions who complain of cognitive problems. My proposal is to conduct a pilot trial of neurofeedback as a potential therapy of individuals with suspected CTE.

    Description 2:Within the sport concussion literature, there has been a call for more precise and accurate methods for diagnosing an injured athlete who may have suffered a concussion during competition or in off-field activities. Thankfully, research on the use of qEEG (Quantitative Electroencephalography) with patients with head injuries has (Duff, 2004) demonstrated reliable and measurable physiological markers that are associated with sport-related concussion. The research has shown that the qEEG map is the most sensitive type of brain imaging test for identifying post-concussion syndrome, detecting a concussion with 96 percent accuracy up to four months after injury, and it can track the impact of repeated injuries over multiple years time. Recent studies have been showing HRV Biofeedback Neurofeedback and Ultra Low Pulse Stimulation is successful for treating concussions and TBI.. Neurofeedback for concussions and TBI can be individualized for each person and each specific head injury based on brain location, imbalance (frequency [speed], amplitude [energy], and coherence [connectivity]).

    Speakers:

    • J. Lucas Koberda, MD, PhD, Director-TNBC
    • Michael K LindenPhD, PsychologyDirector - Attention Learning Center
    • Leah Lagos, PsyD, Leah Lagos, LLC
    • Randy Benson, MD, Wayne State University

    Learning Objectives:

    • Familiarize with diagnosis of concussion and CTE
    • Describes autopsy findingsDescribes possible symptomatic therapies
    • Discusses a potential role of neurofeedback in future therapy of individuals with suspected CTE
    • Discuss health issues which are frequently co-morbid with chronic TBI presentation and discuss how they may impact response to neurofeedback treatment
    • Review HRV assessment and treatment with athletes with TBI & concussions
    • Understand frequently observed clinical features of Brain Imaging, EEG, qEEG and Neurocognitive Testing profile of multiply concussed athletes
    • Describe expected clinical improvements in qEEG, Neurocognitive testing and symptom presentation which may be expected in patients diagnosed with Neurocognitive Disorder from Traumatic Brain Injury as a result of Ultra Low Pulse Electrical Stimulation, based on initial studies

    Level: Introductory - Intermediate

    Target Audience: Clinicians and Researchers, Psychologists, Physicians, Neurologists, Neurofeedback Therapists, Athletic Trainers, Athletes, Coaches

    Guidelines Applied in Practice: Patient Care - Improves the knowledge on this topic and proposes new study; Participants will be able to list the reasons why concussion assessment, treatment and research requires the need to focus on the individual patient, keeping in mind the various disciplines involved and the need to use quantitative measures such as the qEEG when engaging in this work.

    J. Lucas KoberdaJ. Lucas Koberda Dr. J. Lucas Koberda is a board certified neurologist and an internationally trained physician who completed his residency in Neurology at the Oregon Health Sciences University in Portland, Oregon. Prior to his neurological training, he received his Ph.D. based on his research in the area of tumor immunology. Dr. Koberda is currently affiliated with The Florida State University College of Medicine as a voluntary faculty. In addition, he was also appointed in 2012 as a faculty member (Professor of Neurology) in the Carrick Institute For Graduate Studies. Dr. Koberda has recently founded and became CEO of "Brain Enhancement, Inc." non-for profit organization. This organization focuses on neuromodulation and modern therapy of many neuropsychiatric disorders including Alzheimer's dementia, TBI, depression/anxiety, autistic spectrum/ADHD, epilepsy and chronic pain. His main interest is in neuro-psychiatry and cognitive enhancement. He uses the newest technology of QEEG/LORETA Neurofeedback and magnetic stimulation to successfully diagnose and treat many medical conditions including TBI, seizures, headaches, fibromyalgia chronic pain, anxiety, depression, and prior stroke. Dr. Koberda has also effectively introduced neurofeedback protocols for a cognitive enhancement which may help students and professionals to improve their memory, concentration, verbal function or information processing speed. Dr. Koberda also has been appointed in August, 2010 by Governor Charlie Christ as a member of the Alzheimer's Disease Advisory Committee (The Committee serves as an advising body to the Florida State Government). Dr. Koberda has published multiple publications in different scientific journals and serves as international neuroscience speaker and consultant. Dr. Koberda has been appointed to the Editorial Board of the "Journal of Neurology and Stroke", "International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience", "Journal of Neurology and Neurobiology" and "Journal of Psychology and Clinical Psychiatry". He also serves as a reviewer of the above journals and-"Clinical EEG and Neuroscience".

    Michael LindenMichael Linden Dr. Michael Linden is a licensed Clinical Psychologist, Nationally Certified Biofeedback and Neurofeedback Therapist. Dr. Linden works with athletes with concussions/head injuries, ADD and Aspergers. He has worked with elite athletes in major sports as football, hockey, MMA, baseball, soccer, motor cross & NASCAR. Dr. Linden published (Biofeedback Magazine, 2015) an article where he was able to assess two concussions in a soccer player and successfully treat the symptoms of both, allowing the student to reduce and eliminate her post-concussion symptoms, including constant severe headaches, and remain in school and continue to achieve high academic standards. www.lindenalc.com/concussion. Dr. Linden presented his work on QEEG and promising work with Neurofeedback on concussions/TBI at the 2012 London Summer Olympics and at the Sport Neuropsychology Society meeting in Minnesota in 2013 to representatives of the NFL, NHL and US soccer leagues. He is an editor and author of the book: Applications of Biofeedback and Neurofeedback in Sport Psychology. Dr. Linden was one of the research collaborators in two recent studies of Direct Neurofeedback with retired NFL players with Dementia, which had successful results.

    Leah LagosLeah Lagos Dr. Leah Lagos is a clinical and sport psychologist and BCIA Board Certified biofeedback provider in Manhattan, New York. She earned a doctorate in clinical psychology from Rutgers University and served as a faculty member of the Center of Alcohol Studies at Rutgers University. Highlights of her work with athletes include conducting interviews for NFL teams, as part of Professional Sports Consultants, for more than 9 years. Dr. Lagos has served as a consultant to PGA tour players to provide on-site support at tournaments such as the Masters' Tournament in Augusta, GA. Dr. Lagos has also served as a consultant to US Olympians providing consultation and on-site support at venues such as the London Olympics. As a consulting psychological expert for the media, Dr. Lagos has appeared on the Today Show, NBC Nightly, MSNBC, CNN, CBS, Fox, Sports Illustrated News and ESPN. She is a consulting editor for Biofeedback Magazine: Clinical Journal and is the Chair of the Optimal Performance Section of the American Association of Physiology and Biofeedback.


    BOS08: Research and Clinical Aspects of Autonomic Self-Regulation for...

    Friday, April 13, 2018
    2:00 PM to 3:30 PM

    Title:Research and Clinical Aspects of Autonomic Self-Regulation for Sensitized Pain

    Speakers:

  • JP (Jack) Ginsberg, PhD, Licensed Clinical Psychologist/Neuropsychologist and Research Health Scientist, Dorn VA Medical Center
  • This 90-minute presentation explores the evidence-base and physiological model supporting benefits of Autonomic Self-Regulation (HRVB, attention-focusing, positive emotional state) in alleviation of sensitized chronic pain (SCP). The negative effects of SCP include stress, depression, fatigue and sleep disorder. A common factor of this symptom cluster is sympathetic overdrive shown as reduced HRV, which can be safely and effectively increased with ASR. Part I will consider the design, method, and results of three randomized, controlled clinical studies that our research team has conducted to assess outcomes of the pain symptom cluster after ASR: Study 1 - (Pilot) Veterans with chronic pain, treatment as usual (TAU) control; pre-post; single primary endpoint of pain and stress ratings; Study 2 - (Phase 1) cancer survivors; TAU control; pre-post; primary, secondary endpoints; Study 3 - (Phase 1) Veterans with chronic pain, inactive treatment control; 4 timepoints; primary, secondary, exploratory endpoints. Benefits on symptom cluster outcomes shown by all 3 studies. Planned research will also be presented: Part II delves into the shared central nervous system pathways of SCP and ASR, and illustrates how ASR brings about "left foot braking at the sino-atrial node". SCP provokes the stress response, leading to fear, catastrophizing, and unremitting rumination. Chronic pain sufferers crave being pain-free, have racing brain and insomnia, and feel helpless due to kinesophobia (fear of movement). Catastrophizing and fear rumination provoke sympathetic over-arousal, amplify pain, and are core aspects of SCP. Understanding how ASR empowers patients with SCP to self-regulate and normalize sympathetic over-arousal safely and comfortably, and thereby rehabilitate the ANS in a safe and empirically measurable manner gives the pain practitioner tools to help reduce the burden of the SCP symptom cluster on the pain patient. Consideration will be given to particular aspects of dong ASR within the military culture. Through lecture, data, and interactive discussion, attendees will develop familiarity with the advancing technologies and therapies making ANS science a simple, powerful, and effective tool in the pain clinic.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Define sensitized pain and Autonomic Self-Regulation (ASR)
    • Describe the basic science of heart rate variability (HRV) and its relationship to the technique of ASR
    • Summarize the nervous system pathways shared by sensitized pain and ASR

    Who Should Attend:
    Everyone interested in research and clinical aspects of HRV and HRV Biofeedback

    Level: Introductory

    Guidelines Applied in Practice: Patient Care, Medical Knowledge - Evidence-based support and a physiological model of the benefit of Autonomic Self-Regulation using HRVB, attention-focusing, and positive emotional state to alleviate sensitized chronic pain

    Jay GinsbergJay Ginsberg Dr. Ginsberg has appointments as a Licensed Clinical Psychologist/Neuropsychologist and Research Health Scientist at the Dorn VA Medical Center, and as Basic Science Research Assistant Professor at the USC School of Medicine, in Columbia, SC. He is an advocate for integrative management of pain and PTSD using Autonomic Self-Regulation as a mind-body treatment. He has authored or co-authored more than 30 peer-reviewed publications and served as a scientist reviewer of research grant proposals to NIH, VA, and DoD. He has edited and reviewed numerous published scientific articles. Dr. Ginsberg has been a Principal Investigator and Co-Investigator on research grants funded by DoD, NIH, and the VA, and currently is Co-Principal Investigator on a VA-funded study of HRV Biofeedback treatment of chronic pain in Veterans being conducted at Dorn VAMC and a study of HRVB effects on pain and fatigue in cancer survivors at Greenville Hospital.


    BOS09: Functional Neuroanatomy Key Brodmann Areas, Commissures, Fasciculi...

    Friday, April 13, 2018
    2:00 PM to 3:30 PM

    Title: Functional Neuroanatomy Key Brodmann Areas, Commissures, Fasciculi, and Networks.

    Neurofeedback practitioners require knowledge of functional neuroanatomy in order to understand how the brain functions and how their work can influence that functioning. This workshop gives an overview of the brain's structure, first, with an emphasis on Brodmann Areas (BAs). The primary functions of different BAs will be reviewed and dysfunction in particular areas will be linked to clinical findings, such as findings that correlate with symptoms found in autism, Asperger's Syndrome, depression, anxiety, attention disorders, concussion. and memory deficiencies. This is followed by a shorter discussion of the connections within the brain with a focus on commissures and fasciculi. This leads to how BAs and white matter connections are the foundation of Neural Networks: Default, Executive (memory and attention), Salience, Affect (depression and anxiety/panic), Placebo, and so on. A brief overview of how this knowledge can lead to accurate targeting of sites and connectivity using either single and two channel NFB training or LORETA NFB. The neuroanatomical rational for combining NFB training with Heart Rate Variability training will be noted. This is not a detailed course in Neuroanatomy, which can take a year of study; it does, however, provide an overview of functional neuroanatomy that relates directly to the clinical work that we do every day.

    Speakers:

    • Michael Thompson, M.D.
    • Lynda Thompson, Ph.D., C.Psych., BCN

    Learning Objectives:

    • Be able to site a major function for a minimum of 12 Brodmann Areas
    • Be able to relate a minimum of 6 Brodmann Areas to a neural network
    • Be able to List names of 4 fasciculi
    • Be able to list principle brain areas connected to the Cingulum
    • Be able to list principle brain areas connecting to the Uncinate fasciculus

    Who Should Attend:
    Health care professionals who do any type of neurofeedback hopefully combined with at least Heat Rate Variability Training.

    Level:Intermediate

    Guidelines Applied in Practice: Information Coming Soon


    Michael ThompsonMichael Thompson Michael Thompson, M.D. devotes his time to the administration of the Biofeedback Institute and to writing and teaching. When formerly practicing medicine, he was Associate Professor and head of post-graduate education in Psychiatry, University of Western Ontario, examiner for the Royal College of Physicians (Canada) and chairman of their examinations committee in Psychiatry. Numerous professional publications include A Resident's Guide to Psychiatric Education. While Associate Professor, University of Toronto, he was psychiatric consultant to The Hospital for Sick Children's neurology department. His publications and presentations concerning neurofeedback and biofeedback parallel those of Lynda Thompson, including writing the comprehensive textbook The Neurofeedback Book: An Introduction to Basic Concepts in Applied Psychophysiology, published by the Association for Applied Psychophysiology. Contributions to the fields of psychiatry and applied neuroscience include 48 journal articles, 14 book chapters, and more than 150 presentations in 23 countries concerning neurofeedback and biofeedback.

    Lynda ThompsonLynda Thompson Lynda M. Thompson is a Psychologist who has done teaching, clinical psychology, school psychology, and owned learning centres. She became executive director of the ADD Centre in Toronto in 1993 after discovering the world of neurofeedback and deciding to specialize in that intervention. Her doctoral dissertation (1979) deat with hyperactive children treated with methylphenidaate. She is co-author with William Sears of the A.D.D. Book: New understandings, New Approaches to Parenting Your Child and with Michael Thompson of The Neurofeedback Book and has written chapters and papers and presented on a range of topics including ADHD, Asperger's Syndrome, Stress Management, Parkinson's Disease, and epilepsy. She is the co-recipient, with her husband, of the Lifetime Achievement Award (2010) of the Biofeedback Federation of Europe and the Distinguished Scientist Award (2016) if the Association of Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (AAPB).


    BOS10: Applied Psycho-Physiology in Sport Performance: Bridging the Gap...

    Friday, April 13, 2018
    2:00 PM to 3:30 PM

    Title: Applied Psycho-Physiology in Sport Performance: Bridging the Gap Between Research and the Real World.

    The audience will first be introduced to basic heart rate variability (HRV) principles and the underlying fundamentals of HRV will be described for different issues commonly seen in sport (i.e., stress, anxiety, and pain).
    Information about various commercially available biofeedback training (BFT) and neurofeedback training (NFT) products (i.e., J & J.,Thought Technology, EmWave, Opti International, Focus Band, Interactive Metronome) will be provided for HRV applications and other psycho-physiological interventions. Collaboration between biofeedback professionals and sport psychology consultants, using strategies and techniques for integrating BFT and NFT into their psychology consulting, will be covered.
    A scientifically proven mental performance assessment and training framework in sport will be presented. The applied-research principles of the model will be described, as well as the role of psycho-physiological measures. The initial and latest psycho-physiological research findings in sport performance associated with the predictive qualities of this model will be presented.
    The presentation will further provide clinically useful skills for restoring autonomic imbalance, reducing performance anxiety, and engaging the body's natural recovery processes. Case examples, based on personal clinical and research experiences, are included. Specialized issues, such as implementing HRV BFB in vivo and in real time on the course, field, and court, will be discussed.
    Finally, there will be a Q & A session between the audience and the presenters to discuss different topics of interest related to the content of this symposium.

    Speakers:

    • Harry van der Lei, Physical Therapy, Applied Sport Psychology, Hourglass Performance Institute

    Learning Objectives:

    • Introduction of general biofeedback approaches in sport performance enhancement services
    • Description of an evidence-based mental performance assessment/training framework
    • Observe the utilization of psycho-physiological measures in sport according to the principles of the framework
    • Apply biofeedback training associated with the principles of the framework to enhance sleep quality for athletes

    Level: Intermediate

    Target Audience: Any professional that is interested in the latest advances in evidence-based psycho-physiology practice for the enhancement in health, performance , and well-being.

    Guidelines Applied in Practice: Systems-based Practice - The symposium provides the audience with a systematic mental performance framework that has been scientifically validated via psycho-physiological research by the presenters and peers. The framework provides a tool for biofeedback professionals to educate performance and health principles and to implement psycho-physiological assessment-training programs associated with performance outcomes in sport and daily life. The target audience will identify how mental performance affects skill execution and performance outcomes in sport. The ways in which mental performance can be assessed and trained with biofeedback applications, within a structured and evidence-based framework, will be discussed. Exposure to different biofeedback approaches for the enhancement of performance and health in athletic populations will be presented.


    Domagoj LausticDomagoj Laustic Domagoj Lausic was born in Zagreb, Croatia. He earned a Ph.D. in Sport Psychology from Florida State University. His research interests include team communication, development of expertise, periodization, and biofeedback. His work has been published in scientific and coaching publications and presented at national and international conferences. With an educational background in tennis, Dr. Lausic has been a PTR National Tester, clinician, and a Symposium speaker. Additionally, he is a certified consultant through the Association of Applied Sport Psychology (CC-AASP), is USPTA Elite Professional certified, and has completed all USTA science testing levels and the High Performance coaching program. He worked in several clubs and academies in the Carolinas, including the Van der Meer Tennis Center, and worked/traveled with professional and collegiate level athletes.

    Leah LagosLeah Lagos Dr. Leah Lagos is a Licensed Psychologist in the State of New York, specialist in sport psychology, and Board Certified in Biofeedback. Dr. Lagos has worked with or is currently working with high school, collegiate, and professional athletes as well as teams at several D1 Universities. She has conducted risk assessments for teams at the NFL Combine since 2007. Dr. Lagos is the author of several published articles including: "Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback: A Strategy to Manage Competitive Anxiety" and "Virtual Reality Assisted Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback: A Strategy to Enhance Golf Performance," and "Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback for Post-Concussive Syndrome: Implications for Treatment." As a consulting psychology expert for the media, Dr. Lagos has been featured on NBC, Good Day New York, CNN, FOX News, CBS News, ESPN, and Univision. She has appeared on more than thirty radio shows across the United States including the Doctor's Radio Show on Sirius XM, Howard Stern, and the Frankie Boyer Show. In addition, Dr. Lagos has appeared in several publications including the New York Times, Golf Digest, Bloomberg News, Psychology Today, AM New York, LA Times, and the New York Daily. She is an active member of the American Psychological Association (APA), Association for Applied Sport Psychology (AASP), Association of Applied Psychophysiology & Biofeedback (AAPB), as well as the Biofeedback Foundation of Europe (BFE). Dr. Lagos is the Co-Chair of the Optimal Functioning Section of AAPB.

    Richard GevirtzRichard Gevirtz Dr. Richard Gevirtz is a Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the California School of Professional Psychology at Alliant International University in San Diego. He has been in involved in research and clinical work in applied psychophysiology and biofeedback for the last 30 years and was the president of the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback, 2006-2007. His primary research interests are in understanding the physiological and psychological mediators involved in disorders such as chronic muscle pain, fibromyalgia, and gastrointestinal pain. In this vein, he has studied applications of heart rate variability biofeedback for anxiety, pain, gastrointestinal, cardiac rehabilitation and other disorders. He is the author of many journal articles and chapters on these topics. He also maintains a part time clinical practice treating patients with anxiety and stress related disorders.

    Wesley SimeWesley Sime Until recently Dr. Wes Sime was in private practice as a Health Psychologist at First Step Wellness Program in Lincoln, NE. Prior to 2004 he was a professor in Health & Human Performance at University of Nebraska and previously Director of the Stress Physiology Laboratory & Research Associate at the Cardiovascular Center of the University of Nebraska Medical Center. He was a founding member of BCIA (and served as Chair) as well as one of the founding members of the International Stress Management Association. Dr. Sime was a Co-Principle Investigation on a major research Grant through the National Institute of Occupational Health and Safety titled, "Physiological and psychological assessments of Occupational Stress and Strain in 1000 Workers". Wes worked on the development of "emotional stress testing" while expanding his knowledge of tension control using EMG biofeedback. Wes participated in the Multi-Center National Research Study on Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial (MRFIT), NIH funded study on the testing the efficacy of reducing coronary risk factors by diet, exercise, blood pressure control and management of type A personality factors. This experience with the psychosocial element of coronary risk led him to characterize his primary research interest as stress physiology. His subsequent Ph.D. dissertation on the effect of EMG biofeedback and relaxation training on awareness of muscle tension was published in the journal Psychophysiology and started him on the path toward more psychology research.

    Harry Van Der LeiHarry Van Der Lei Dr. Harry van der Lei is a consultant in mental performance and stress management, with specialization in sport performance. His dissertation research included telemetric biofeedback technology to examine psycho-physiological measures in elite golfers during competition. He is a proponent of evidence-based practice and is a certified biofeedback and HRV practitioner. He has implemented biofeedback services for a wide variety of athletes, from youth and collegiate golfers to World Champions and Olympic Gold winners.


    BOS11: Expect the Unexpected

    Friday, April 13, 2018
    2:00 PM to 3:30 PM

    Title: Expect the Unexpected

    In the beginning of the field of neurofeedback there were those doing "state based" EEG training like Joe Kamiya and Elmer Green, and those doing "clinical" work with epilepsy associated largely with Barry Sterman or Nils Birbaumer. ADHD and other applications came later. but the scientific proof level work in Epilepsy was quite impressive even in the mid 1970s. I would dare to suggest that despite the efficacy proofs, the bulk of the NF practitioners today do not work with epilepsy as a primary indication for clinical work.. At least not knowingly. However approximately 20% of those with ADHD and from 40-60% of those with ASD have "unexpected" epileptiform discharges or paroxysms, meaning there are clients with these patterns who need our help. There are many thousands of clients with intractable epilepsy and thousands more with unexpected epileptiform discharges. A recent series of severe intractable epileptic cases will be used to illustrate the life changing nature of applying NF to these cases. Very current publications on the efficacy of treating psychiatric clients who have epileptiform activity but no seizure history will be shared, as will publications challenging the standard of practice in psychiatry in treating these clients without reviewing the EEG. A plea from a mother whose daughter was successfully treated for intractable epilepsy asking the field to provide access to far more practitioners who are willing to accept these cases will be shared. .

    Speakers:

    • Jay Gunkelman, QEEG-D, Brain Science International
    Learning Objectives:
    • identify the incidence of epileptiform activity in autism and ADHD
    • Specify the duration of EEG evaluations which meet standards
    • Differentiate sensitivity and specificity in EEG used in testing for eoileptiform activity
    • Identify the contribution of the EEG/qEEG in diagnosis/treatment of clients in ruling out discharges Differentiate the treatment approach for neurology and psychiatry in prescribing anticonvulsants

    Level: Introductory

    Target Audience: psychiatrists, neurologists, psychologists and all NF clinicians.

    Guidelines Applied in Practice: Medical Knowledge - Identification of the commonality of Epileptiform discharges in common clinical populations and the power of the NF intervention in these clients, with 40-to 60 percent of autism and 10-20percent of ADHD clients being undiagnosed carriers of these patterns. Expect the Unexpected


    Jay GunkelmanJay Gunkelman Jay has processed over 500,000 EEGs since 1972. Jay was the first EEG technologist to be certified in QEEG (1996) and was granted Diplomate status in 2002. He has co-authored the textbook on EEG artifacting (2001). Jay remains busy with current projects and publications related to his seminal paper on EEG endophenotypes (2005, Clinical Electroencephalography). He is co-founder and Chief Science Officer of Brain Science International and is a popular lecturer worldwide on the topic of QEEG and phenotype identification of neurological disorders.


    BOS12: An Integrative Model and Clinical Approach to Frontal Brain Activation...

    Friday, April 13, 2018
    2:00 PM to 3:30 PM

    Title: An Integrative Model and Clinical Approach to Frontal Brain Activation in Emotion and Behavior

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) electromagnetic tomographic analysis (ETA) imaging techniques provide a mechanism for exploring decisions, while the individual is directly engaged in choice making, thus exposing precognitive emotional responses to identified beliefs, thoughts, feelings, and actions. This presentation discusses frontal EEG gamma band activity research, at the precognitive level and its use for describing approach-avoidance decision making. Gamma is the primary focus of measurements as it provides an immediate emotional response to a stimulus, even before a conscious thought has formed. Our approach process provides the intensity of a person's emotional response to a stimulus by measuring voxel activation and also provides emotional directionality by differentiating approach/withdrawal responses within the prefrontal cortex. While agreement between the self-report and the scanned gamma activation can form confirmation, additional insights are revealed when the two data basis do not agree. By examining precognitive gamma asymmetry, we can expose the thought process, especially the role of emotions. While most of the time our initial brain activity aligns with our written response, internal conflict can be exposed when our stated response and the brain imaging do not align. In addition, emotional triggers are very personal and differ in directionality and intensity from person to person.

    Speakers:

    • Thomas Collura, PhD, MSMHC, Clinical Director, Brain Enrichment Center
    • Ronald Bonnstetter, PhD, VP Research and Development, Target Training International, Ltd.
    • Nancy Wigton, PhD, Clinical and Managing Director, Applied Neurotherapy Center, LLC

    Learning Objectives:

    • "Describe how regional brain activity in the frontal lobes (left/right and mesial/dorsal) regulates emotional sensation, perception, and comprehension." Explain in functional terms why some individuals find certain words "emotional triggers"
    • Understand the implications of measuring frontal lobe gamma asymmetry
    • "Describe experiments using frontal gamma brain activity in response to cue words, and how they reveal precognitive brain activity."
    • "Explain in a socio-psycho-dynamic model, how brain responses to stimuli are one component in interindividual interaction and change."

    Who Should Attend:
    Practitioners and researchers interested in understanding human emotional decision-making mechanisms in behavior and in clinical practice.

    Level: Intermediate

    Guidelines Applied in Practice: Interpersonal and Communication Skills - "This presentation will offer insights into how humans react to personal triggers in a conversation, thus, exposing underlying precognitive beliefs and related emotions that ultimately lead to our behaviors and decisions. We will highlight the protocols used to generate these modified event-related potentials with a focus on gamma frontal lobe asymmetry. Administering these protocols in real world contexts, such as during coaching sessions, job interviews, and possibly even in psychotherapeutic milieus (given proper ethical constraints), are promising areas for additional study and promise to impact and potentially expose hidden decision-making mechanisms of the preconscious mind. The understanding of these principles articulates the connection between emotion and experience. This process is able to expose those connections and help individuals come to grips with the role of their beliefs and the impact these precognitive responses have on their decisions. This will contribute to improving the gap existing between the experience of emotions, and the understanding of them, in the self, and in others."

    Nancy WigtonNancy Wigton Nancy Wigton, Ph.D., LPC, BCN, QEEGD, holds a Ph.D. in Psychology, a M.A. in Counseling, is a Licensed Professional Counselor, Board Certified Neurofeedback therapist (BCIA, Fellow), and certified QEEG Diplomate. She has been in the counseling field since 1991 and in private practice providing QEEGbased Neurofeedback since 2000. She is also Adjunct Professor at Grand Canyon University and Executive Editor of the journal NeuroRegulation. Dr. Wigton's areas of specialization and research interests include EEG biofeedback and QEEG analysis; as well as z-score neurofeedback, with an emphasis on 19-channel zscore neurofeedback in clinical settings. Since 2008, she has presented at conferences and published her work with z-score neurofeedback, with a recent emphasis on 19-channel z-score neurofeedback.

    Ron BonnstetterRon Bonnstetter Intrigued by the science of the brain, inspired to teach and intent on developing a better understanding of how neuroscience informs human behavior, Dr. Ron Bonnstetter serves as the senior vice president of research and development for Target Training International, ltd. Current research interests include the development of neurology-based communication strategies and behavioral and values interaction analysis that expose decision-making emotional triggers and expand our understanding of interpersonal neurobiology. In his previous role as director of secondary science education, Dr. Bonnstetter was the first recipient of the National Senior Outstanding Science Educator of the Year Award and the only secondary science preparation program recognized in the national Search for Excellence in Science Education. Combining his present research with his previous educational endeavors, he is the host of a video series titled: The Science of Self in 60.

    Thomas ColluraThomas Collura Thomas F. Collura, Ph.D., MSMHC, QEEG-D, BCN, NCC, LPCC is Clinical Director at the Brain Enrichment Center. He earned his doctorate from Case Western Reserve University in Biomedical Engineering with a concentration in Neuroscience, and also has undergraduate degrees from Brown University in Philosophy and Biology. He has been on the staff of the Department of Neurology, Cleveland Clinic, as a neurological computing scientist and clinical instructor in neurophysiology, and has been an Adjunct Assistant Professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. He completed his Master's degree in Mental Health Counseling from Walden University and is a National Certified Counselor as well as board certified in Quantitative EEG and in Neurofeedback. He is the author of "Technical Foundations of Neurofeedback" published by Taylor/Francis. He is a Past President of the International Society for Neurofeedback and Research (ISNR), and currently President of the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (AAPB). He is a certified mentor with the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance (BCIA). Dr. Collura has published dozens of peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, and research reports. At the Brain Enrichment Center, he provides counseling and neurofeedback services, and directs clinical and basic research.


    BOS13: Drug Exposure in Utero: Clinical definition, characteristics and...

    Friday, April 13, 2018
    4:00 PM to 5:00 PM

    Title: Drug Exposure in Utero: Clinical definition, characteristics and symptoms, neurophysiology, and effects across developmental domains.

    First Part: Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) is a group of problems that occur in a newborn exposed to addictive drugs in the womb. Currently, there is no diagnostic grouping for treating the cluster of problems present in children suffering from intrauterine drug exposure (IUDE). Moreover, there are relatively few data providing descriptive patterns of persistent cognitive, social, and executive function deficits in this population (Franck, 1996; Freeman, 2000; Kelley, 1992; Kne, Shaw, Garfield, & Hicks, 1994; Mayes, Cicchetti, Acharyya, & Zhang, 2003; McNichol, 1999). Methods: Case grouping of 16 (IUDE) clients between the ages of 3 and 25 without the presence FAS. Assessment data included IVAPlus, CPT-3, Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System, Beck Youth Inventory, quantitative EEG and LORETA source methods, MRI was also conducted on numerous clients to rule out organic potential cause of deficits. IUDE clients at time of initial assessment were taking combinations of medications (Zyprexa, Abilify, Seroquel, anxiolytics, antidepressants, Stimulants, High blood pressure and others). Results: Clients may or may not present with attentional difficulties; however, in many cases stimulant medications appear to worsen performance on the CPT or IVA. Verbal fluency and color-word interference tasks scores are variable. Measures of self-concept are lower across all clients, anxiety and depression scales are typically elevated. The primary difficulty exhibited by these individuals appears to reside in the executive function area of social rules, interpersonal skills and understanding the reasons for compliance with reductions in egocentrism - in addition to the emotional reactivity to this confusion. Conclusions: IUDE presents a growing problem in the US due to current opioid problems and it is imperative to accurately classify these children according to this specific set of problems as opposed to up to 8 DSM categories that ultimately lead to increased medications with poor academic and behavioral outcomes. Directions for future treatment paradigms will also be discussed as well as effects of neurofeedback and learning.

    Speakers:

    • Rex Cannon, PhD, CSO/COO, Knoxville Neurofeedback Group

    Learning Objectives:

    • Increase knowledge of effects of drug exposure in utero
    • Understand EEG and LORETA correlates of specific deficits
    • Increase knowledge based of methods to address behavioral sequelae
    • Understand effects of medications on this group of children

    Who should attend: All clinicians and researchers

    Level: Advanced

    Guidelines Applied in Practice: Patient Care, Medical Knowledge, Practice-based Learning and Improvement - Specific deficits that persist in these children (functionally and neurophysiology) which can aid in utilizing neurofeedback methods to improve functionality and reduce pharmacological side effects

    Rex CannonRex Cannon Dr Cannon is an accomplished author, researcher and clinician. He has published over 40 articles in peer reviewed journals and continues as an advocate for neurofeedback as a primary treatment for any number of psychological and developmental issues.


    BOS14: Combining Low-level Brain Training and Neurofeedback for Optimal...

    Friday, April 13, 2018
    4:00 PM to 5:00 PM

    Title: Combining Low-level Brain Training and Neurofeedback for Optimal Performance

    Brain processing skills are essential for key tasks such as speech processing, focus and attention, complex comprehensional or even motorical tasks. And while neurofeedback training by itself can already have an astonishing impact on performance levels in such skills, there yet is room for more.
    Low-level functions are fundamental brain functions such as processing speed, spatial hearing, pitch discrimination, pattern recognition or choice-reaction time, to only name a few. Each of those functions closely relate to specific complex tasks each of us is facing on a daily basis.
    I.e. phoneme discrimination is essential for swift and efficient speech processing; without suitable performance levels in processing speed and pitch discrimination, a fast phoneme recognition with a high hit rate is near to impossible. And while HEG and EEG neurofeedback training have shown great positive impact on attention skills, they can benefit even the more when being combined with training low-level functions.
    In this oral presentation you will learn about means to swiftly assess your client's low level skill set and how to improve such capabilities in him in reasonable time frames. The effects of such trainings have been shown not only in dyslexic children or in adults with hearing problems, but also using brainmaps with fMRI.
    The author has 20 years of experience in this field and participated in a number of related research projects both nationally and internationally. He introduces means of expanding and enhancing the range of tools available to biofeedback and neurofeedback professionals in both analysis and treatment for clients.

    Speaker:

    • Ralph Warnke, MA, ass. Iur., MediTech Electronic GmbH >

      Learning Objectives:

      • What are low level brain functions and why are they important?
      • How do low level brain functions impact on learning capabilities and attention skills?
      • How can combining biofeedback / neurofeedback therapy with low level training be beneficial?

      Who should attend: Healthcare professionals and trainers dealing with: ADD/ADHD patients, clients with learning disorders, stroke patients, Asperger /autism and related disorders. Furthermore professional sports and management trainers dealing with peak performance training.

      Level: TBD

      Guidelines Applied in Practice: Patient Care, Medical Knowledge, Practice-based Learning and Improvement - Participants will be introduced to low level functions as a means of obtaining additional information on the client's status quo. In additional, they will learn about means to utilize low level training by integrating it as an additional / complementary approach to further support training in clients both with deficits in learning, perception or attention as well as clients in the area of peak performance.


    BOS15: Cultivating Gratitude, Compassion, Courage, and Resilience with HRV...

    Friday, April 13, 2018
    4:00 PM to 5:00 PM

    Title: Cultivating Gratitude, Compassion, Courage, and Resilience with HRV Biofeedback and Mindfulness

    Gratitude, compassion, courage, and resilience have all been shown to be strongly associated with human health and wellbeing. Specifically, these traits are associated with less pain, less inflammation, less anxiety and depression, better cardiac health, better sleep, quicker recovery from illness, better overall physical health. It is therefore desirable to increase the strength of these traits in ourselves and our clients. The answer seems simple - let's be more grateful, more compassionate, courageous and resilient. And yet, increasing abstract and intangible human traits is much more complicated than it sounds. Fortunately, we have a tool that gives us structure and guidance in developing gratitude, compassion, courage, and resilience. Heart rate variability and mindfulness have both been empirically demonstrated to be associated with these traits. Heart Rate Variability biofeedback is an easy-to-use efficacious tool that can help is in the development of these sought-after human traits. In this session, we will discuss ways in which heart rate variability biofeedback, combined with mindfulness based skills, may be used to foster gratitude, compassion, courage and resilience. We will provide the audience with practical guidelines that they will be able to implement for themselves and their clients.

    Speakers:

    • Inna Khazan, PhD, BCB, Clinical Psychologist, Cambridge Health Alliance, Harvard Medical School
    • Leah Lagos, PsyD, Leah Lagos, LLC

    Learning Objectives:

    • Discuss empirical evidence underlying the connection between gratitude, compassion, courage, resilience and HRV biofeedback
    • Discuss specific biofeedback and mindfulness based interventions that may be used to cultivate gratitude, compassion, courage, and resilience
    • Implement these interventions in his/her own practice
    • Who Should Attend:
      Anyone interested in learning how to use HRV biofeedback and mindfulness in cultivating essential human characteristics of gratitude, compassion, courage, and resilience

      Level: Introductory

      Guidelines Applied in Practice: Patient Care - This session will introduce the audience to empirically validated practices to increase their patients' traits of compassion, courage, gratitude and resilience, all of which have been show to be associated with increased well being.

    Leah LagosLeah Lagos Dr. Leah Lagos is a clinical and sport psychologist and BCIA Board Certified biofeedback provider in Manhattan, New York. She earned a doctorate in clinical psychology from Rutgers University and served as a faculty member of the Center of Alcohol Studies at Rutgers University. Highlights of her work with athletes include conducting interviews for NFL teams, as part of Professional Sports Consultants, for more than 9 years. Dr. Lagos has served as a consultant to PGA tour players to provide on-site support at tournaments such as the Masters' Tournament in Augusta, GA. Dr. Lagos has also served as a consultant to US Olympians providing consultation and on-site support at venues such as the London Olympics. As a consulting psychological expert for the media, Dr. Lagos has appeared on the Today Show, NBC Nightly, MSNBC, CNN, CBS, Fox, Sports Illustrated News and ESPN. She is a consulting editor for Biofeedback Magazine: Clinical Journal and is the Chair of the Optimal Performance Section of the American Association of Physiology and Biofeedback.

    Inna  KhazanInna  Khazan Inna Khazan, Ph.D., BCB. is a faculty member at Harvard Medical School, where she has taught biofeedback and supervised trainees since 2008. A clinical psychologist specializing in health psychology and biofeedback, Dr. Khazan also maintains a private practice in Boston, working with clients on optimizing their health and performance, using biofeedback and mindfulness-based approaches to psychotherapy. She has been invited to give keynote and conference presentations and teach workshops at national and international conferences and prestigious institutions in the Boston area on the topics of biofeedback and mindfulness. Dr. Khazan has conducted biofeedback and mindfulness trainings for notable institutions in the US and abroad, including the US Navy Special Warfare, US Army Special Forces, and the Stuttgart Opera and Ballet Company. Dr. Khazan is the author of the highly-regarded Clinical Handbook of Biofeedback: A Step-by-Step Guide to Training and Practice with Mindfulness book, published by Wiley Blackwell in May 2013. MPA


    BOS16: Placebo Concepts in Biofeedback Practice

    Friday, April 13, 2018
    4:00 PM to 5:00 PM

    Title:Placebo Concepts in Biofeedback Practice

    Placebo concepts range from providing a sugar pill to clients and patients and then observing some emotionally beneficial outcome, to having a set of placebo processes become associated with medically beneficial outcome such as curing various cancers. The presentation will discuss some definitions of placebo (and nocebo), and discuss plausible neural mechanisms that give rise to placebo effects, from placebo analgesia to activation of an immune response to fight diseases. Some useful strategies for introducing the topic of placebo effects with clients and patients will be discussed. All skill levels are welcome.

    Speakers

    • Richard Harvey, PhD, San Francisco State University, HED

    Learning Objectices:

    • Describe definitions of placebo and nocebo processes
    • Identify plausible neural mechanisms that contribute to placebo effects
    • Learn techniques for teaching clients and patients about the power of placebo

    Target Audience: All levels

    Level: Introductory

    Guidelines Applied in Practice: Practice-based Learning and Improvement

    Richard HarveyRichard Harvey Richard Harvey, PhD teaches at San Francisco State University, and has served as President of the Western Association of Biofeedback and Neuroscience (when the association was called the Biofeedback Society of California), and the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback. Richard has also served in leadership positions in the San Francisco Psychological Association, and the American Public Health Association, Alternative and Complementary Health Practices, promoting biofeedback techniques in the public health interest. Professional experience includes working as an Epidemiologist in Orange County, California; as a Tobacco-Use Research Center Fellow; and, directing the UC Irvine Counseling Center Biofeedback Program, before joining the faculty at San Francisco State University. Research includes developing holistic stress-reduction interventions using biofeedback, as well as other federally funded research related to tobacco use and cessation.


    BOS17: Fix Your Business, Fix Your Patients

    Friday, April 13, 2018
    5:05 PM to 6:05 PM

    Titlte: Fix Your Business, Fix Your Patients

    The safety card on any airplane instructs that in the case of disaster, you are to put your oxygen mask on first before assisting others. The same should be true for your business, however we commonly prioritize our patient's concerns and needs over the strength and sustainability of our own businesses. We rarely take time to work ON the business because we are so busy working IN the business, and week after week, month after month we find ourselves too BUSY to plan for the future, as if we would know what to do even if the time was available. To provide the best experience and achieve the greatest results with your patients, you first must build and maintain a sustainable business. Most of us do the opposite, relying on clinical experience, resources and technology to help patients while leaving the business as an afterthought. If you build it, they will come.right? Unfortunately, not. Luckily, you can still develop the business strategies and systems to grow a successful, sustainable practice. This talk will touch on some of those principles and strategies.

    Speakers:

    • Seth Conger, BCN-t, Chief Operating Officer, Carolina HealthSpan Institute

    Learning Objectives:

    • How to own your own value as a practitioner
    • How to Pre-Educate your potential customers
    • How to Package your services
    • How to create business systems to increase the efficiency and profitability of your business

    Who Should Attend: All Business Owners, practitioners and staff

    Level: Introductory

    Guidelines Applied in Practice: Systems-based Practice - Business systems and strategies is one of the largest gaps in the Neurofeedback and Biofeedback fields. This session will directly help to correct this gap.

    Seth CongerSeth Conger Seth Conger is the COO at Carolina HealthSpan Institute, a large functional medicine clinic in Charlotte, NC. He is responsible for expansion of services and locations, research, marketing, program development, professional education and the Neuroscience Division. Seth is a BCIA certified Neurofeedback Technician. He works with clients as a performance coach and utilizes various forms of Neurofeedback to make positive life changes. Seth has an entrepreneurial background, has started and expanded multiple companies in various fields, and has now set his sights on solving problems in the medical industry. His work focuses on infiltrating large organizations with more efficient and effective, evidence based treatments to redefine the way we look at and treat neurologic and mental health disorders. Seth has considerable "on-stage" experience presenting on-behalf of the US Army in front of small groups of VIP's and in front of over 1500 individuals.


    BOS18: Personalized EEG-Neurofeedback as a Treatment for ADHD

    Friday, April 13, 2018
    5:05 PM to 6:05 PM

    Title: Personalized EEG-Neurofeedback as a Treatment for ADHD

    Several neurophysiological subtypes based on electroencephalographic (EEG) biomarkers have been identified in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD; Johnstone, Gunkelman, & Lunt, 2005). However, most studies investigating the efficacy of neurofeedback (NFB) as a treatment for ADHD use uniform treatment protocols that are not taking into account individual EEG biomarkers (Arns, Ridder, Strehl, Breteler, & Coenen, 2009). A recent pilot study suggests that personalizing NFB protocols to individual EEG biomarkers of ADHD might lead to increased specificity and efficacy of treatment (M. Arns, Drinkenburg, & Leon Kenemans, 2012). Hence, the objective of this presentation is to investigate the effects of personalized EEG-NFB as a treatment for ADHD. It will provide an overview of personalized EEG-neurofeedback protocols for ADHD and introduce results from a pilot project that aimed to integrate a neurofeedback clinic as part of the Service offering of the Office for Students with disabilities in a Canadian college. A hundred and eight college students with a diagnosis of ADHD received free personalized EEG-NFB two times a week over a period of four months. Half of the participants was randomly assigned to the experimental condition. The other half was put on a waiting list to serve as a control group and received treatment later. Resting state EEG signals were recorded to evaluate overall brain activity pre- and post- training, and to determine individual EEG-biomarkers for selection of personalized treatment protocol. ADHD behavioral symptoms were assessed pre- and post- training using the Conners' Adult ADHD Rating Scale (CAARS-S:L), the Integrated Visual and Auditory Continuous Performance Test (IVA-2) and assessment of executive functions. A significant change was observed in subjects trained in EEG-NFB, both in brain activation patterns and at the behavioral level. More specifically, normalization of targeted resting brain waves was observed in the experimental group. Results from this pilot project demonstrate the feasibility of personalizing NFB protocols to individual EEG biomarkers of ADHD and the efficacy of NFB as a treatment for ADHD. On a broader level, this presentation will allow for a better understanding of the impact of neurofeedback training on neural and behavioral correlates of ADHD.

    Speakers:

    • Caroline Dupont, BSc, Université de Montréal

    Learning Objectives:

    • Summarize EEG-neurofeedback theory and technique
    • Describe personalized EEG-neurofeedback protocols for ADHD
    • Utilize EEG-neurofeedback in treating ADHD
    • Assess neural and behavioral effects of EEG-neurofeedback for ADHD
    • Critique neurofeedback as a treatment for ADHD

    Who Should Attend:
    This presentation is of interest for both clinicians and researchers, as it provides an overview of neurofeedback as a treatment for ADHD and introduces a pilot project with clinical significance.

    Level: Intermediate

    Guidelines Applied in Practice:Practice-based Learning and Improvement

    Helene  BriseboisHelene  Brisebois Dr. Brisebois spent the first decade of her career as a clinical psychologist, before accepting a professor position in the psychology department at Montmorency College. Recently, she specialized in neuropsychology and the applications of neurofeedback. In collaboration with her colleague Dr. Szabo, she put together a research program to investigate the effectiveness of neurofeedback on ADHD in college students. Her work focuses on creating alternative and innovative intervention programs that benefit students.

    Hélène BriseboisHélène Brisebois Dr. Brisebois spent the first decade of her career as a clinical psychologist, before accepting a professor position in the psychology department at Montmorency College. Recently, she specialized in neuropsychology and the applications of neurofeedback. In collaboration with her colleague Dr. Szabo, she put together a research program to investigate the effectiveness of neurofeedback on ADHD in college students. Her work focuses on creating alternative and innovative intervention programs that benefit students.

    Andrea SzaboAndrea Szabo Dr. Szabo is a Professor in Psychology at Montmorency College (Laval, Quebec). As a neuropsychology specialist, her work, in collaboration with Dr. Brisebois, focuses on understanding the effectiveness of personalised QEEG-based Neurofeedback on ADHD in college students. The ongoing research is founded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

    Brendan ParsonsBrendan Parsons Brendan Parsons, M.Sc., BCN, is currently finishing his Ph.D. in neuropsychology at the University of Montreal. He has been active in the field of neurofeedback as a clinician, researcher and educator for over a decade. He has worked primarily with both young and adult clinical populations, as well as in peak performance for executives and professional hockey (NHL) and Olympic athletes. Most recently, he co-founded the Institut Neurosens, and provides education, training and ongoing support to French-speaking practitioners around the world. He is vice-president and director of science for the Association Francophone de Biofeedback & Neurofeedback.

    Caroline DupontCaroline Dupont Caroline Dupont completed a bachelor's degree in psychology from McGill University in 2012. During her undergraduate studies, she worked as a research assistant for the Child Health and Human Development Program at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre. She then completed her master's degree in neuropsychology at Université de Montréal in September 2017, where she studied the relationship between cerebral structures, early brain activity and neurodevelopment. Caroline is now enrolled in the PhD research program in neuropsychology at Université de Montréal. She investigates ADHD in young adults, with a specific interest for emerging treatments, such as neurofeedback, and ways to improve diagnosis.


    BOS19: Neurofeedback Efficacy in the Treatment of ADHD

    Friday, April 13, 2018
    5:05 PM to 6:05 PM

    Title: Neurofeedback Efficacy in the Treatment of ADHD

    This symposium presentation provides a critical evaluation of the evidence supporting the efficacy of neurofeedback for the treatment of ADHD.

    Speakers:

    • Ashlie Bell, LSW, Saybrook University
    • Carolyn Trasko, LCSW, LADC, Saybrook University

    Learning Objectives:
  • be able to identify the core symptoms of ADHD
  • Be able to describe evidence-based interventions to treat ADHD
  • Be able to evaluate the empirical support for neurofeedback treatment of ADHD
  • Who Should Attend:
    Clinicians and researchers interested in evidence-based treatment of ADHD.

    Level: Introductory

    Guidelines Applied in Practice: Patient Care - This presentation will identify the neurofeedback interventions for ADHD that have received the strongest empirical support.

    Carolyn TraskoCarolyn Trasko Carolyn Trasko, LCSW, LADC is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker, a Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselor, and a certified Integrative Wellness Coach in her home state of Connecticut. She has worked in the field of behavioral health for over 25 years. Carolyn is currently a doctoral student within the College of Integrative Medicine and Health Sciences at Saybrook University. Her doctorate will be in the field of Mind-Body Medicine with a specialization in Integrative Mental Health and Integrative Wellness Coaching services. She has maintained a private practice for the past 15 years where she utilizes a holistic, psychodynamic, systems perspective, focusing on the integration of mind, body, and spirit. In the course of her career, Carolyn has provided clinical assessment, treatment, consultation, and training services related to the behavioral health, educational, and developmental needs of infants, children, adolescents, and adults. Within her private practice, she specializes in the provision of biopsychosocial treatment to survivors of complex trauma. She maintains a connection to her community through her volunteer work serving as the Disaster Mental Health Lead of her state's local chapter of the American Red Cross. She has had the honor and privilege of providing disaster mental health relief services at Ground Zero after the 9/11 terrorist attacks and at the Sandy Hook mass shooting. Carolyn is a dedicated and compassionate healer practitioner who is humbled and honored to serve as mentor, guide, and witness for those who are experiencing the transformative process of healing and recovery. Through networking, advocacy, and treatment provision, Carolyn will continue to serve as an informed leader within the integrative medicine movement so that this paradigm may become a fundamental component of medical and behavioral health services. Her vision is one where individuals receive seamless, multidisciplinary, integrative care that serves as both prevention and intervention for overall health, wellness, and disease management.

    Ashlie BellAshlie Bell Ashlie Bell is a licensed social worker, certified neurotherapist, and doctoral student with Saybrook University. She has worked in the field of health and wellness for over 13 years, gaining experience with a wide variety of populations and interventions. She is BCIA certified in neurofeedback and completed an internship at the Thompson's ADD Centre to enhance her skills. Currently, Ashlie owns a private practice providing integrative neurotherapy services for learning disorders, traumatic brain injuries, and a variety of mental health issues. This practice incorporates comprehensive assessments (i.e. qEEG/LORETA brain analyses, neurocognitive testing, psychosocial interviewing, stress biomarker assessment, etc.) and individualized, multimodal treatment plans (i.e. EEG/peripheral biofeedback, psychotherapy, somatic interventions, mindfulness-based approaches, lifestyle/health coaching, imagery, trauma-informed cognitive-behavioral therapy, etc.). For her doctoral research, Ashlie is examining the effects of LORETA z-score neurofeedback and heart rate variability biofeedback on neural activation patterns, heart rate variability, and mental health symptoms in adults with chronic PTSD.


    BOS20: Stress Where are We now: Physiology, Manifestations and Management

    Friday, April 13, 2018
    5:05 PM to 6:05 PM

    Title: Stress Where are We now: Physiology, Manifestations and Management

    TBD

    Speakers:

    • Jan Newman, MD, MA, FACS,ABIHM

    Learning Objectives:

    • Discuss the philosophy of Naturopathic Medicine
    • Summarize the training and scope of practice for licensed naturopathic doctors
    • Explain the role naturopathic doctors in primary care

    Who Should Attend:
    TBD

    Level: TBD

    Guidelines Applied in Practice: TBD

    Jan NewmanJan Newman Information Coming Soon


    Back To Top