2017 AAPB Annual Meeting


Saturday Breakout Sessions

BOS21: Enhancing Wellness and Reducing Burnout in University Students and...

Saturday, April 14, 2018
8:00 AM to 9:00 AM

Title:Enhancing Wellness and Reducing Burnout in University Students and Medical Trainees

This symposium presents three topics related to university students' and medical trainees' health and performance. As part of a general education class focusing on the psychophysiology of stress reduction, undergraduates are taught values clarification, autogenic training and perspective building techniques. They practice these skills in the classroom and at home to deepen and extend their awareness and to manage symptoms of stress. At semester end, students report that the experiential practices significantly improved their well-being and personal health. The most successful teaching/coaching strategies in this setting will be highlighted. Simple behavior changes such as when and what you eat (reducing sugars and simple carbohydrates and increasing vegetables, fruit and protein), daily exercise and movement, and stress management significantly impact student health. After four weeks of implementing simple "common sense" health habits, students experience an increase in energy, less emotional reactivity and fewer symptoms. Interestingly, the benefits of practicing relaxation skills depends on the purpose and time of day. Early morning practice appears to reduce conflict during the day while evening practice decreases insomnia. These findings suggest that therapists need to start first with optimizing the clients' biological substrate through healthy eating, appropriate exercise, and stress management at the appropriate time before initiating more skill mastery based therapies. Medical residency is a stressful time in training placing learners at risk for burnout. We designed a specialty-specific program to decrease risk and build resident resiliency. Twenty-four family medicine residents and 17 internal medicine residents participated. IRB approval was obtained and all participants provided consent. Assessment tools measured resiliency, burnout, mindfulness and perceived stress before and after the program. Programming included coping skills, mindfulness, balance, time management, optimal performance and positive psychology. Compared to controls at post test, family medicine residents showed a statistically significant decrease in emotional exhaustion (p = 0.01) and depersonalization/compassion score (p=0.013) (ANOVA). Internal medicine resident post test results showed improvements in resiliency (p = 0.009) and decreased perceived stress (p = 0.048) (paired t-tests). Resiliency programs are practical and efficacious in decreasing indicators of burnout in medical residents.

Speakers:

  • Angele McGrady, PhD, Professor, University of Toledo College of Medicine
  • Rickk Harvey, PhD, Associate Professor, San Francisco State University
  • Erik Peper, PhD, Professor, San Francisco State University

Learning Objectives:

  • Detail the results of an undergraduate course focused on health and wellbeing on symptoms of distress
  • Discuss the most common sources of stress for university students and medical trainees
  • Explain the importance of optimizing the clients' biological substrate before beginning complex skill training
  • Summarize the effects of a specialty specific resiliency program on indicators of distress and burnout in medical trainees

Who Should Attend:
psychologists, counselors, physicians, graduate students

Level: Introductory

Guidelines Applied in Practice: Interpersonal and Communication Skills - Recent research highlights the extent of distress and impaired function in university students and medical trainees. This symposium highlights ways to improve the health of students and increase resiliency in medical trainees

Erik PeperErik Peper Erik Peper, PhD, BCB, is an international authority on biofeedback and self-regulation and since 1971 he has been researching factors that promote healing. He is Professor of Holistic Health Studies / Department of Health Education at San Francisco State University. He is President of the Biofeedback Foundation of Europe and past President of the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback. He has a biofeedback practice at BiofeedbackHealth (www.biofeedbackhealth.org). He is an author of numerous scientific articles and books such as Muscle Biofeedback at the Computer, Make Health Happen, Fighting Cancer-A Nontoxic Approach to Treatment, and Biofeedback Mastery. He publishes the blog, the peper perspective-ideas on illness, health and well-being (www.peperperspective.com). He is a recognized expert on holistic health, stress management and workplace health. His research interests focus on psychophysiology of healing, illness prevention,, respiratory psychophysiology and optimizing health with biofeedback.

Richard HarveyRichard Harvey Richard Harvey, PhD, is faculty in the Department of Health Education and Holistic Health. He has served in leadership roles as past president of the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (AAPB) and the Western Association for Biofeedback and Neuroscience (WABN, also known as the Biofeedback Society of California or BSC) among other roles. Rick identifies with mascots connected to his educational experiences. For example, he teaches at San Francisco State University (home of the Golden Gaters); and attended University of California Berkeley (Golden Bear), Santa Cruz (Golden Slug) and Irvine (Anteater), where he completed his doctoral studies in psychophysiology at the University of California, Irvine in the Department of Psychology of Social and Behavior in the School of Social Ecology. His research interests include topics related to biofeedback, tobacco cessation and, psychological courage development.

Angele McGradyAngele McGrady Dr. McGrady received her B.S. from Chestnut Hill College, her Masters in Physiology from Michigan State University, her Ph.D. in Biology and her M. Ed in Counseling from the University of Toledo. She is a licensed counselor and a certified provider of biofeedback. Currently Dr. McGrady is a professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Toledo Medical Center (UTMC), where she also maintains a practice in counseling and biofeedback. Dr. McGrady's professional activities include: Past President of the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback and past Associate Editor of "Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback". Dr. McGrady has experience in all levels of teaching : medical, nursing, physician assistant, graduate and residency. She has designed wellness programs for medical students, medical residents and more recently college level athletes. Her curriculum vita lists 85 peer reviewed articles and book chapters. Her first book "Pathways to Illness, Pathways to Health" with Don Moss was released in 2013 by Springer. Her second book, also with Dr. Moss deals with an integrative approach to chronic illness and is expected in 2017.


BOS22: Using Augmented Reality & Multi-Modal Anatomical Imagery in the...

Saturday, April 14, 2018
8:00 AM to 9:00 AM

Title: Using Augmented Reality & Multi-Modal Anatomical Imagery in the Treatment of Cortical Re-mapping, Body Schema, & Chronic Pain

Modern neuroscience is now demonstrating that complex sensory stimulation and discriminative-associative learning are the biggest drivers of neuroplasticity-based change toward mapping upon a more constructive and accurate cortical representation - of both constitutive body image and function - within and throughout various levels of processing within the human brain. In situations involving hypersensitization and chronic pain or hyperalgesia, there is ample evidence from neuroimaging and correspondent clinical presentation for demonstrating compensatory and often widespread change in the internal processing of pain signaling as well as a corresponding distortion in the proportion and distribution of sensory-motor cortical representation or 'body schema' that can also be clinically demonstrated through novel and objective inquiry.
To this effect, Basic Science researchers have called for more innovative and novel approaches to treatment intervention. One such approach having been more recently tested through comparative clinical trial (RCT / N=30, by Sobie, 2016) is Body Schema Sensory Acuity Training (using multi-modal / cross-modal augmented reality) being combined with Feldenkrais Method® -based movements. These treatment components - as a direct form of informational somatic feedback - consisted of full-scale skeletal models, kinematic avatars, skeletal density imagery, temporal bone-vestibular system relationships, and haptic self-touch techniques being aimed to re-conceptualize participant's prior notions and beliefs regarding body schema / body part localization and pain - especially low back pain (LBP).
This symposium presentation will provide an overview of Tim's RCT study design and results, and will provide a simple tool that attendees can utilize and implement within their practice for improving upon pain diminished posture, perception of action, and control of movement - in ways not typically discernible through multi-channel sEMG or other forms of peripheral / traditional biofeedback.

Speakers:

  • Timothy J. Sobie PT, PhD, BSc, Clinical Director, Alliant Physical Therapy & Integral Medicine, PLLC

Learning Objectives:

  • Outline and review emergent findings for explaining chronic pain and neuroplasticity from a sensory information, imagined movement, and affective-emotional processing perspective
  • Utilize and Integrate a Sensory Discriminative Perceptual Model and Augmented Reality to assist patients and clients to rediscover their The Hidden Anatomical Senses; including a Skeletal Density-Vestibular Concept for Body Schema & Pain - and to apply its corresponding cognitive re-attribution
  • Demonstrate how multi-modal models and techniques for the 'Anatomical and Perceptual Reframing of Background Body Schema' can function as a constellation of competing informational pathways in the treatment of chronic musculoskeletal pain syndromes - and especially persistent low back pain
  • Consider and compare that self-perception of global summation skeletal contiguity trajectories may be a more effective and functionally efficient end-organ for feedback and information processing as compared to sEMG motor-unit end-plate activity for purposes of actualizing overall movement quality, locomotion, and analgesic motor control.

Who Should Attend:
Any and all interdisciplinary professions involved in innovative and non-pharmaceutical treatments for chronic pain

Level: Intermediate

Guidelines Applied in Practice:Patient Care, Systems-based Practice - Differentiated from usual prescriptive care : "Unless there is significant change within a person's internal model for the sensory representation of effective action, becoming expressed and confirmed through new attention to new movement, then there is really no change at all...we're otherwise just going through the motions."

Timothy SobieTimothy Sobie Dr. Tim Sobie, Ph.D. is the founder and clinical director of Alliant Continuum Care, Physical Therapy and Integral Medicine, PLLC. Tim has over 30 years' experience as a physical therapist and over 20 years' experience as a Feldenkrais Method® practitioner with 5+ years as a clinical applications principal investigator and scientific researcher. Having completed experiential training in The Feldenkrais Method® through the Movement Studies Institute of Berkeley, California, Tim sought to explore further scientific applications through studies in Behavioral Medicine and Whole Systems Design through Antioch University, Seattle, interdisciplinary mind-body medicine and somatic therapies through the Center for Mind Body Medicine in Washington D.C., and has most recently completed his clinical research dissertation at Saybrook University, Oakland to earn a Ph.D. degree in Psychology with a sub-specialization in Psycho-physiology for the study of neurologically mediated and body-in-brain-based chronic pain mechanisms-and for developing innovative applications in their novel treatment.


BOS23: Integrating Biofeedback Services Within an Academic Medical Center ...
BOS23: Integrating Biofeedback Services Within an Academic Medical Center Focusing on Chronic Pain Management

Saturday, April 14, 2018
8:00 AM to 9:00 AM

Title Integrating Biofeedback Services Within an Academic Medical Center Focusing on Chronic Pain Management

Biofeedback treatment has been previously validated for a wide range of pain related conditions. Though the research on clinical effectiveness continues to increase, there is limited availability to understanding the mechanisms for integrating biofeedback within pain management clinics throughout larger hospital systems. With growing evidence for the limitations of pharmacological treatment for chronic pain, an emphasis of non-pharmacological interventions for chronic pain continues to be in high demand. The purpose of this talk is to review the role of pain psychology within a medical center, establishing "physician buy-in," reimbursement for services, and treatment integration of biofeedback services. We will review effective communication of biofeedback treatment to both physicians and patients, appropriate biofeedback referrals and case examples.

Speaker:

  • . Heather King, PhD, Clinical Assistant Professor, Stanford University Medical Center, Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Pain Medicine
  • Sarah Gray, PsyD, Assistant in Rehabilitation Psychology, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital; Instructor, Harvard Medical School
Learning Objectives:
  • Summarize billing options for biofeedback services
  • Practice effective communication to doctors about the use of biofeedback
  • Communicate the role of biofeedback in multidisciplinary care
  • Recognize the difference of a biomedical versus biopsychosocial approach in chronic pain treatment

Who Should Attend:
Practitioners interested in implementing bfb into a medical practice

Level: Introductory

Guidelines Applied in Practice: Patient Care, Professionalism, Systems-based Practice - "How to become part of a multidisciplinary team using biofeedback services. Education medical providers on the services associate with biofeedback in relation to treating chronic pain from a biopsychosocial perspective"

Sarah GraySarah Gray Dr. Sarah Gray is an Instructor of Psychology of Harvard Medical School, an Assistant in Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital, and a Clinical Health Psychologist providing Rehabilitation Psychology and Pain Psychology with the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, including providing behavioral medicine approaches for the multidisciplinary Functional Restoration and Pain Management Program. She is the Owner of Integrative Psychology and Behavioral Medicine in Arlington, Massachusetts where she provides innovative and evidence-based therapy, coaching, consulting, and presentations.

Heather Poupore-KingHeather Poupore-King Dr. King earned her PhD in Clinical Psychology from the California School of Professional Psychology in San Francisco. She completed her post-doctoral training in Chronic Pain Management at Kaiser Permanente in San Francisco where she received specialized training in various self-regulation approaches. She is also board certified in biofeedback. At Stanford, she serves as the primary supervisor for the pain psychology fellowship and educates medical fellows on treatment from a biopsychosocial perspective. In addition, she conducts individual and group clinical treatments and serves as the Director of Pain Education. She has developed and implemented various self-regulation programs focusing on patient educational materials, groups, and biofeedback services. In addition, she has trained the medical assistants in the Pain Clinic to serve as health coaches providing self-management support to patients. Research support includes: Lead therapist of CBT for Two NIH grants and the Director of Treatment, $8.8M PCORI grant.


BOS24: Evidence for the Effectiveness of Biofeedback in Cardiovascular Disease

Saturday, April 14, 2018
8:00 AM to 9:00 AM

Title:Evidence for the Effectiveness of Biofeedback in Cardiovascular Disease

Dr. Moravec will begin with an overview of cardiovascular physiology and the cardiovascular response to stress, focusing on why biofeedback should be an effective intervention in patients with cardiovascular diseases, based on alterations in autonomic function and biomarkers of disease severity. She will continue with a review of articles from the literature which demonstrate the effectiveness of biofeedback in cardiovascular disease, both for prevention and regression, as well as stress relief. The session will end with data from Dr. Moravec's own work, showing that biofeedback can reverse disease markers in patients with heart failure and coronary artery disease

Speaker:

  • Christine Moravec, PhD, Scientist, Cleveland Clinic

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease
  • Discuss the role of autonomic imbalance in cardiovascular disease
  • Describe the use of biofeedback to alter autonomic imbalance
  • Cite studies from the literature which support the hypothesis that biofeedback can be used effectively in cardiovascular disease
  • Explain Dr. Moravec's work on heart failure and coronary artery disease and why it is significant .

Who Should Attend:
Anyone interested in biofeedback as an alternative therapy for cardiac patients.

Level: Introductory

Guidelines Applied in Practice: Patient Care, Medical Knowledge, Practice-based Learning and Improvement - The underlying physiology of cardiovascular disease which makes biofeedback a relevant treatment modality, and evidence that it works.


Christine MoravecChristine Moravec Dr. Christine Moravec is a research scientist focusing on cardiovascular physiology and the reversibility of cardiovascular disease using various types of therapies. She and her colleagues have tested the hypothesis that patients with chronic disease conditions can learn to control their own autonomic nervous system using biofeedback, and that such control will slow the progression of disease and possibly cause reversal of disease markers.


BOS25: Professional Ethics and Practice Standards for Biofeedback and...

Saturday, April 14, 2018
11:00 AM to 12:30 PM

Title: Professional Ethics and Practice Standards for Biofeedback and Neurofeedback: An Overview

This session will review legal and ethical responsibilities of biofeedback and neurofeedback practitioners. Biofeedback professionals are governed in clinical practice by state regulations under the relevant licensing act, professional codes of ethics for his or her home profession, and the Professional Standards and Ethical Principles of Biofeedback (9th rev., May 2016) of the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance (BCIA). Neurofeedback practitioners are also governed by the 2012 updated Standards of Practice for Neurofeedback and Neurotherapy, endorsed by the International Society for Neurofeedback and Research. The workshop will provide an overview of medical ethics, ethical principles endorsed by most behavioral professions, and a discussion of the current AAPB/BCIA and ISNR standards. Violation of such guidelines, even when unintended, invites the risk of lawsuit, criminal prosecution, financial penalties, loss of licensure, and expensive and stressful legal and administrative reviews. The presenter will discuss relevant guidelines governing: entry level competence; scope of practice; the delivery of experimental or non-documented therapies; the informed consent process; principles of privacy, confidentiality, and privileged communication; guidelines on dual/multiple relationships; and questions of touch, privacy, and respect. The presenter will place emphasis on the imperative to maintain a positive treatment relationship, eliciting rapport and trust. The therapeutic relationship, along with knowledge of current standards of practice and adherence to professional guidelines, minimize the risk of misunderstanding and litigation.

Speakers:

  • Donald Moss, PhD, Dean, College of Integrative Medicine and Health Sciences, Saybrook University

Learning Objectives:

  • Review and discuss the Professional Standards and Ethical Principles of Biofeedback (9th revision, 2016), published by BCIA, and their interpretation for decisions in biofeedback practice
  • Attendees will review and discuss the Standards of Practice for Neurofeedback and Neurotherapy (2012), endorsed by ISNR, and their application for everyday decisions in conducting neurofeedback.
  • Learn how to navigate the conflicting jurisdictions of state laws and regulations, professional codes of conduct, BCIA guidelines, and federal regulations
  • Learn and apply to their own practices current principles governing the delivery of remote training, and the requirements for safe and responsible patient-directed and family-directed training.

Who Should Attend:
Practitioners at all levels

Level: Intermediate

Guidelines Applied in Practice: Patient Care, Professionalism - The presenter will review and discuss practice standards governing entry level competence, continuing education requirements, and scope of practice, all of which impact on patient care, the professionalism in the field, and improving standards in clinical practice. .


Donald MossDonald Moss Donald Moss, Ph.D., is Dean, College of Integrative Medicine and Health Sciences, at Saybrook University, Oakland, CA. There he has built training programs in biofeedback, clinical hypnosis, integrative mental health, and integrative/functional nutrition. Dr. Moss has served as president of Division 30 (hypnosis) of the American Psychological Association, and president of the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (AAPB). He is currently President-Elect of the Society for Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis. He is also the ethics chair for the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance. Moss is co-editor of Foundations of Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback (AAPB, 2016), co-author of Pathways to Illness, Pathways to Health (Springer, 2013), and chief editor of Handbook of Mind-Body Medicine for Primary Care (Sage, 2003) and Humanistic and Transpersonal Psychology (Greenwood, 1998). He has a book under contract for Springer with co-author Angele McGrady on Integrative Pathways: Navigating Chronic Illness with a Mind-Body-Spirit Approach.


BOS26: The EEG/qEEG Signature of Diffuse Axonal TBI, its Connection to...

Saturday, April 14, 2018
11:00 AM to 12:30 PM

Title: The EEG/qEEG Signature of Diffuse Axonal TBI, its Connection to Alzheimer's and Remediation with Audio-visual Entrainment.

There has been much attention directed at both concussion and Alzheimer's in recent years. Both conditions are basically considered to be non-treatable. Prevalent in falls, motor-vehicle accidents, sports injuries and viral infections, diffuse axonal interruptions (DAI) are the most prevalent type of brain impairment incurred. Select brain regions far outside the site of injury are also taken "off line" through a mechanism known as diaschisis. A DAI is a disconnect in the pathway between neurons and the thalamus, termed a thalamocortical disconnect, which results in a shutdown of major networks, highly attenuated alpha brain waves and severe delta and beta phase asymmetries across networks. This results in impaired emotional stability, cognition and sleep. Metabolic imaging such as PET and SPECT show metabolic shutdown deep into the thalamus. Following an insult, the brain enters an inflammatory and fever condition which likely form the basis of the DAI. Therefore, a DAI may be considered a major part of inflammatory neuropathy. Given this inflammatory model, severe viral infections may also mimic a head injury. Most people with DAIs receive a good bill of health by the medical community based on MRI results, and yet they struggle with debilitating symptoms ranging from cognitive impairments, obsessive-compulsive disorder, addiction, depression, anxiety and inability to hold a job. Electroencephalography (EEG) tracings and quantified EEG (qEEG) are powerful tools for the detection of a DAI. EEG and qEEG measures confirm post-concussion neurological deficits in accordance with patient symptoms. Alpha brain waves are associated with a calm mind & meditation and are the brain waves that help initiate relaxation and sleep. The glymphatic system, handled by astrocytes, is the brain's waste disposal system which flushes out protein waste from neuronal firing. It is primarily active during deep sleep. Without deep sleep, protein deposits build up in the brain. Studies show severe insomnia usually follows a TBI and is prevalent for years prior to the development of Chronic Traumatic Encephalitis (CTE) and Alzheimer's. Various brain stimulation techniques ranging from needle electrode stimulation to ultrasonic thalamic activation from externally placed transducers targeting the thalamus have been to show to "kickstart" the thalamocortical loop. Audio-visual Entrainment (AVE) is a brain stimulating technique involving the presentation of flashing lights in a pair of eyesets and pulsing tones via a pair of headphones at brain wave frequencies. AVE has been shown to "kickstart" both glia and neurons. AVE used in a surprising and counter-intuitive way has given brain-injured people a second chance at regaining their lives, occupations, social life, relationships and good mental health.

Speaker:

  • Dave Siever, CET, Mind Alive Inc.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn the underlying physiology and behavioral symptoms of diffuse axonal TBIs and how they differ from a cortical injury
  • Learn the EEG/qEEG signature of diffuse axonal TBIs
  • Learn how diffuse axonal TBIs can become Chronic Traumatic Encephalitis or Alzheimer's
  • Learn how to use Audio-visual Entrainment as a treatment technique.

Who Should Attend:
TBD

Level: Intermediate

Guidelines Applied in Practice: Patient Care Neurophysiology - This session will show the ID of diffuse axonal TBIs from concussion and infection and how they play out in maladies that are elusive don't respond to neurofeedback. It will also demonstrate the simplicity of its treatment with audio-visual entrainment.

David SieverDavid Siever Dave Sievergraduated in 1978 as an engineering technologist. He later worked in the Faculty of Dentistry at the University of Alberta designing TMJ Dysfunction related diagnostic equipment and research facilities. He organized research projects, taught basic physiology and the advanced TMJ diagnostics course. Dave had noted anxiety issues in many patients suffering with TMJ dysfunction, prompting him to study biofeedback, which he applied to the patients and then later, Dave design biofeedback devices. In 1984, Dave designed his first audio-visual entrainment (AVE) device - the "Digital Audio-visual Integration Device," or DAVID1. Since this time, through his company, Mind Alive Inc., Dave has been researching and refining AVE technology since, specifically for use in relaxation, boosting academic performance and treating anxiety, depression, PMS, ADD, FMS, SAD, pain, cognitive decline and insomnia, and the EEG signature of both concussion and disease-caused TBI and it's treatment with AVE. Dave presents primarily at various conferences and for special interest medical/psychology groups. Dave also designs Cranio-Electro Stimulation (CES) products and is a leading provider of transcranial DC stimulation (tDCS) and devices. As a result of Dave's commitment to research, Mind Alive Inc now owns three patents involving neurotechnology. Dave continues to conduct research, perform a quantitative EEG service and designs new products pertaining to enhanced performance and mental wellness. Dave has developed a 30 CEU course on Stimulation Technologies with Saybrook University and the Behavior Biomedical Foundation. As a firm believer in staying young through neuro-stimulation, Dave engages in many activities including flying of RC airplanes and drones, kayaking, diving, caving & climbing through glaciers, biking, sailing, math, music & song-writing and most anything that will help keep his Mind Alive.


BOS27: We Can Do Better: Achieving peak performance in sports

Saturday, April 14, 2018
11:00 AM to 12:30 PM

Title: We Can Do Better: Achieving peak performance in sports

Achieving your personal best is multifactorial. This session explore integrated strategies by which athletes are able to perform at an elite level and transcend their own limitations. This transformational approach to achieve miracles includes courageous, motivated athletes, tenacious superior family support, and caring biofeedback and neurofeedback trainers/experts. Specific strategies include HRV , respiration, neurofeedback training, imagery rehearsal with electromyography to reduce pre-competitive anxiety, manage competitive stress, and enhance recovery between competitions, and optimize performance so that the athlete can achieve their personal best during competition. Erik Peper: Winning the Gold in Weightlifting Using Biofeedback, Imagery and Cognitive Change This presenation summarizes and describes the protocol how breathing and electromyography feedback combined with imagery contributed to achieving Jo Aita, age 46 and weighing 58 kg, set the Masters World Records and Masters Games Records for her age group in Snatch, Clean & Jerk and Total Olympic weightlifting at the World Masters Games by lifting 71 kg in the Snatch and 86 kg in the Clean and Jerk Olympic lifts. She incorporated biofeedback and visualization training to help optimize her performance. Sue Wilson: Miracle On the Court: Team Work & Practice The presentation will illustrate how a young athlete is overcoming severe epilepsy to be able to perform at an elite level on the tennis court. Using a transformational model, the roles necessary to create this miracle include a courageous, motivated athlete, tenacious superior family support, and caring NF trainers/experts. The integration of other modalities such as medications, sleep, and alternative therapies are a part of the model. A general overview of the neurofeedback process (assessment, training schedules, and homework) in this remarkable case will be shown. Leah Lagos: Amplifying the Benefits of Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback for Peak Performance The session will provide clinically useful skills for amplifying the benefits of heart rate variability biofeedback for peak performance. Hands on training and specific performances strategies, based on over a decade of Dr. Lagos' clinical and research experiences, are included. Specialized performance approaches to reduce pre-competitive anxiety, manage competitive stress, and enhance recovery between competitions will also be highlighted.

Speaker(s):

  • Erik Peper, PhD, BCB, San Francisco State University
  • Leah Lagos, PsyD, Leah Lagos, LLC
  • Vietta Wilson PhD, BCB, BCN Retired Professor, York University, Toronto Mental Trainer Supervisor Ace Tennis Burlington, Mental Training Consultant Niagara Academy of Tennis, Consultant to Paralympic Archers & various athletes

Learning Objectives:

  • How to use electromyography to train imagery
  • Learn how to supplement specific resonance frequency breathing techniques with emotional cues to heighten the body's ability to flexibly respond to stress and recover
  • How to set up an interactive transformational data sheet
  • Undertand the need for ongoing motivation and success outside the training regime
  • Understand the relationship between Heart Rate Variability (HRV) and peak performance

Who Should Attend:Anyone who wants to be inspired by what is possible with a dedicate team of biofeedback professionals and health professionals and researchers who want to learn a performance protocol for implementing Heart Rate Variability (HRV) Biofeedback (BFB) and imagery in an applied setting.

Level:Introductory

Guidelines Applied in Practice: Practice-based Learning and Improvement - Share new integrated techniques that can improve sports performance and approach that is applicable for work with clients.

Vietta WilsonVietta Wilson Sue Wilson is a world renowned Performance Enhancement Specialist considered by many to be the "grandmother" of biofeedback in sport. She is a professor emeritus from York University with a Lifetime Achievement award from the Biofeedback Foundation of Europe. Her teaching and research is in sport psychology and learned self-regulation. Sue has worked with top executives and over 50 world or Olympic athletes from 1976 to Rio 2016. The software and training courses she developed for the BFE's Optimizing Performance and Health Suite are distributed worldwide. She also does mentoring for other biofeedback based clinicians. Sue is currently providing mental training for Canada's Paralympic archers as well as two tennis clubs and individual athletes from gymnastics to hockey to figure skating. She has dedicated much of her career to researching the connection between stress and its effect on physical health and mental performance. Her acknowledged expertise is in the teaching of brief skills, validated by psychophysiology, to allow individuals to perform to their capabilities

Erik PeperErik Peper Erik Peper, PhD.. BCB, is an international authority on biofeedback and self-regulation and since 1971 he has been researching factors that promote healing. He is Professor of Holistic Health Studies / Department of Health Education at San Francisco State University. He is President of the Biofeedback Foundation of Europe and past President of the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback. He has a biofeedback practice at BiofeedbackHealth (www.biofeedbackhealth.org). He is an author of numerous scientific articles and books such as Muscle Biofeedback at the Computer, Make Health Happen, Fighting Cancer-A Nontoxic Approach to Treatment, and Biofeedback Mastery. He publishes the blog, the peper perspective-ideas on illness, health and well-being (www.peperperspective.com). He is a recognized expert on holistic health, stress management and workplace health. His research interests focus on psychophysiology of healing, illness prevention,, respiratory psychophysiology and optimizing health with biofeedback.

Leah LagosLeah Lagos Dr. Leah Lagos is a clinical and sport psychologist and BCIA Board Certified biofeedback provider in Manhattan, New York. She earned a doctorate in clinical psychology from Rutgers University and served as a faculty member of the Center of Alcohol Studies at Rutgers University. Highlights of her work with athletes include conducting interviews for NFL teams, as part of Professional Sports Consultants, for more than 9 years. Dr. Lagos has served as a consultant to PGA tour players to provide on-site support at tournaments such as the Masters' Tournament in Augusta, GA. Dr. Lagos has also served as a consultant to US Olympians providing consultation and on-site support at venues such as the London Olympics. As a consulting psychological expert for the media, Dr. Lagos has appeared on the Today Show, NBC Nightly, MSNBC, CNN, CBS, Fox, Sports Illustrated News and ESPN. She is a consulting editor for Biofeedback Magazine: Clinical Journal and is the Chair of the Optimal Performance Section of the American Association of Physiology and Biofeedback.


BOS28: Interpersonal Biofeedback: A Hybrid of Biofeedback and Couples Counseling

Saturday, April 14, 2018
2:00 PM to 3:30 PM

Title: Interpersonal Biofeedback: A Hybrid of Biofeedback and Couples Counseling

Biofeedback has almost 50 years of research and clinical application while Marital Counseling has many more years and a higher usage rate. Research on both fields as a hybrid is minimal and recent advances have made the study of Interpersonal Biofeedback more accessible. Clinical usage of Interpersonal Biofeedback has been reported to have success by this author and others.
The goal of this presentation is to educate participants in this unique and promising new form of treatment. They will be shown a research session which will display audio and video of husband and wife along with 5 channels of physiology (hand temperature, sweat gland activity, respiration rate, heart rate and heart rate variability) and how couples in I-BF therapy are learning to self-regulate physiology to enhance marital satisfaction. Psychophysiological Profiling of couples and treatment approach and strategies will be discussed as well as outcome from a small study and from clinical work. The workshop will also discuss ways in which participants will be able to incorporate Interpersonal Biofeedback into their professional practices.

Speaker:

  • Steven C Kassel, MFT, BCB, BCN, Biofeedback and Family Therapy Center

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will demonstrate they understand the role of psychophysiological assessment in light of interpersonal dynamics
  • Participants will demonstrate understanding of how to integrate biofeedback into interpersonal counseling settings including marriage counseling and family counseling with children and adolescents
  • Participants will be able to create treatment plans to integrate biofeedback into relationship focused therapy

Who Should Attend:
Psychotherapists who are interested in incorporating biofeedback in their work with couples or other dyads.

Level: Intermediate

Guidelines Applied in Practice: Interpersonal and Communication Skills - The session will teach the audience how the use of psychophysiological monitoring in couples counseling allows couple client to learn about one another in a previously unknown manner and to see in action how their positive and negative communication styles affect psychophysiology.

Steven KasselSteven Kassel Mr. Kassel has been Board Certified in Biofeedback since 1985 and Board Certified in Neurofeedback since 1992. His practice had been focused on helping patients with stress related medical disorders, pain and stress management and general individual and family counseling. Since becoming a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist in 1991, he has focused his work in several areas such as trauma and its remediation, has taught workshops on Biofeedback in Grades K-12 and is working with couples in Interpersonal Biofeedback. He is past president of the the Western Association of Biofeedback and Neuroscience (formerly the Biofeedback Society of California), was seen on a BBC science program "Natural Mystery" and is a health care reform activist.


BOS29: Practical Strategies for Teaching Your Clients to Breathe

Saturday, April 14, 2018
2:00 PM to 3:30 PM

Title:Practical Strategies for Teaching Your Clients to Breathe

Healthy breathing is one of the foundations of human health and well-being. Overbreathing, one of the most common breathing dysregulations, affects 10-25% of US population and is associated with conditions such as asthma, panic disorder, anxiety, chest pain, GI distress, and chronic pain. Oftentimes, our clients come to us reporting that the "deep breathing exercises" they've learned previously do not work for them, make them feel lightheaded or short of breath, or make them feel worse. These symptoms are often a sign of overbreathing, a behavior of breathing out too much carbon dioxide, resulting in hypocapnia, or low levels of carbon dioxide. Hypocapnia, in turns, leads to significant emotional, cognitive, behavioral and physiological changes that may seriously impact health and performance. The purpose of this session is to discuss the physiology of breathing and provide the audience with practical strategies for breathing assessment and teaching healthy breathing, including guidance for explaining healthy breathing to clients, tips for practice and training, and resources for client use.

Speakers:

  • Inna Khazan PhD, BCB, Clinical Psychologist, Cambridge Health Alliance, Harvard Medical School
  • Fredric Shaffer, PhD, BCB, PhD, Psychology, Professor, Truman State University

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss the physiology of healthy breathing and overbreathing
  • Recognize signs that a client may be overbreathing and discuss ways to further assess overbreathing
  • Apply strategies for teaching healthy breathing in practice

Who Should Attend:
Anyone interested in learning effective strategies for teaching healthy breathing

Level: Introductory

Guidelines Applied in Practice: Patient Care - By empirically demonstrating the methods of stress reduction that are most effective, we could ensure that care providers and giving/recommending their patient's the best and most effective care.

Fredric ShafferFredric Shaffer Fredric ShafferM, PhD, BCB is a biological psychologist and professor of Psychology and former Department Chair at Truman State University, where he has taught since 1975 and has served as Director of Truman's Center for Applied Psychophysiology since 1977. In 2008, he received the Walker and Doris Allen Fellowship for Faculty Excellence. In 2013, he received the Truman State University Outstanding Research Mentor of the Year award. Dr. Shaffer was the principal co-editor of Evidence-Based Practice in Biofeedback and Neurofeedback (3rd ed.) and authored 12 of its chapters. He was a co-editor with Donald Moss of Foundations of Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback: A Book of Readings. He co-authored with Mark S. Schwartz a chapter on entering the field and assuring competence in Biofeedback: A Practitioner's Guide (4th ed.). He co-authored with Donald Moss, a chapter on biofeedback in the Textbook of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (2nd ed.). He co-authored with Rollin McCraty and Christopher Zerr, the Frontiers in Psychology review article "A healthy heart is not a metronome: An integrative review of the heart's anatomy and heart rate variability." He is a contributing editor for the journal Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback. He is a BCIA-accredited educator for Biofeedback, HRV Biofeedback, Human Physiology, Physiological Psychology, and Psychopharmacology. His current research focuses on techniques to increase heart rate variability. Dr. Shaffer is a BCIA Senior Diplomate in Biofeedback. Dr. Shaffer is the Chair of the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance (BCIA), director of its Biofeedback and HRV Biofeedback Task Forces, and member of its Neurofeedback Task Force, and Treasurer for the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (AAPB).

Inna  KhazanInna  Khazan Inna Khazan, Ph.D., BCB. is a faculty member at Harvard Medical School, where she has taught biofeedback and supervised trainees since 2008. A clinical psychologist specializing in health psychology and biofeedback, Dr. Khazan also maintains a private practice in Boston, working with clients on optimizing their health and performance, using biofeedback and mindfulness-based approaches to psychotherapy. She has been invited to give keynote and conference presentations and teach workshops at national and international conferences and prestigious institutions in the Boston area on the topics of biofeedback and mindfulness. Dr. Khazan has conducted biofeedback and mindfulness trainings for notable institutions in the US and abroad, including the US Navy Special Warfare, US Army Special Forces, and the Stuttgart Opera and Ballet Company. Dr. Khazan is the author of the highly-regarded Clinical Handbook of Biofeedback: A Step-by-Step Guide to Training and Practice with Mindfulness book, published by Wiley Blackwell in May 2013. MPA


BOS30: Benefits of Posture Training using Biofeedback

Saturday, April 14, 2018
2:00 PM to 3:30 PM

Title: Benefits of Posture Training using Biofeedback

The purpose of this session, is fourfold: (1) to present the background related to the development of the Upright posture trainer; (2) to discuss usage of the Upright posture trainer in different training programs, populations, and settings; (3) to present research using the Upright posture trainer in a healthy population; and (4) to discuss how to overcome the challenges the Upright posture trainer presents.
The introduction will provide a history of the development of the Upright posture trainer. Erik Peper has been instrumental in the development of the upright posture trainer along with physical therapists from Israel. He will discuss the evolution of the technology used for this device. Collapsed or slouching posture has been associated with negative health outcomes such as pain, depression and overall stress ratings as well as declines in general health, emotional well-being and energy/fatigue levels. The posture trainer has been developed to help alleviate these negative outcomes resulting from poor posture. This demonstration will include how to use the posture trainer, explain differences between training programs, and how to properly choose a training program. Additionally, we will discuss how to use the Upright posture trainer effectively in a clinical setting. However, research using the posture trainer is limited given the recent innovation of this device. We will discuss the research conducted with the posture trainer in our labs at Texas Tech University and San Francisco State University. The purpose of the research was to examine the effects of the Upright Training Program on self-esteem, muscle force and endurance, and thoracic spinal angles. Instrumentation discussed will be the wireless bionomadix EMG system by Biopac, microFET2 wireless digital dynamometer for measuring force output, flexicurve ruler, and bubble inclinometer for measuring spinal angles. Novel strength testing protocols used in this study, designed by physical therapists, will presented through videos with detailed handouts for clinicians. This session will close by discussing challenges the Upright presents and how these challenges were overcome during the research. This information will be valuable to anyone who wishes to use the posture trainer in clinical settings or research studies.

Speakers:

  • Kelsey James, BSc, Graduate Student, Texas Tech University
  • Erik Peper, PhD, Professor, San Francisco State University
  • Annette Booiman, PhD, Health and Lifestyle Coah, Dutch Paramedic Institute
  • Jacalyn McComb, PhD, Professor, Texas Tech University
  • Ahalee Cathey, BS, Graduate Student, Texas Tech University
  • Lauren Mason, Student, San Francisco State University

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will be able to use a posture feedback device to teach trainees to improve health
  • Attendees will be able to explain how improvements in posture can affect self-esteem
  • Attendees will be able to describe instrumentation for assessing muscular back strength, endurance, and fatigue
  • Attendees will be able to apply the principles of posture biofeedback training to clinical populations

Who Should Attend: Clinicians (PT, OT, chiropractors, sports medicine, etc.)

Level: Introductory

Guidance in Applied Practice: Patient Care, Medical Knowledge, Practice-based Learning and Improvement - How portable biofeedback posture training devices improve patient outcomes.

Annette BooimanAnnette Booiman Annette Booiman works for more than 30 years as a Mensendieck Somato Cognitive Therapist in her private clinic in the Netherlands, where she combines Mensendieck Therapy and Biofeedback. For over 8 years she is associated to the CSR Centre, making stress-assessments for clients with burn-out. Her main interest is how to mobilize people to participate in actively regaining healthy movement patterns and a better lifestyle. She is co-author of several articles about Biofeedback and a teacher at the NPI, a Dutch Post Graduated Education Institute for Physical Therapists. She is BCB certified by the BCIA and she did present at former AAPB and BFE meetings.

Jacalyn McCombJacalyn McComb Dr. Jacalyn McComb is a professor of exercise physiology at Texas Tech University. She earned her bachelor's degree from Florida Southern University, her master's degree from Southeast State University, and her doctoral degree from the University of Mississippi. She holds the American College of Sports Medicine's Clinical Program Director and Clinical Exercise Physiologist certification as well as the American Council of Exercise certifications as a yoga and a Pilate's instructor. She began her academic career at Texas Tech University in 1989. Dr. McComb teaches a variety of graduate and undergraduate courses, especially in clinical exercise physiology, both face-to-face and online. She is a Phi Beta Kappa Honorary Faculty Member and Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine. Dr. McComb's research interests center around Hans Seyle's Stress Response and the concept of Allostatic Load.

Erik PeperErik Peper Erik Peper, PhD.. BCB, is an international authority on biofeedback and self-regulation and since 1971 he has been researching factors that promote healing. He is Professor of Holistic Health Studies / Department of Health Education at San Francisco State University. He is President of the Biofeedback Foundation of Europe and past President of the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback. He has a biofeedback practice at BiofeedbackHealth (www.biofeedbackhealth.org). He is an author of numerous scientific articles and books such as Muscle Biofeedback at the Computer, Make Health Happen, Fighting Cancer-A Nontoxic Approach to Treatment, and Biofeedback Mastery. He publishes the blog, the peper perspective-ideas on illness, health and well-being (www.peperperspective.com). He is a recognized expert on holistic health, stress management and workplace health. His research interests focus on psychophysiology of healing, illness prevention,, respiratory psychophysiology and optimizing health with biofeedback.


BOS31: Resolving the Concussion Conundrum

Saturday, April 14, 2018
2:00 PM to 3:30 PM

This session will cover the following topics

The overall focus of this presentation is the use of biofeedback and neurofeedback interventions, coupled with non-pharmacologic behavioral interventions, to restore self-regulation of autonomic and central nervous system functioning placed into dysregulation by concussions or medical illness. Concussions can result in musculo-skeletal, vascular, autonomic and neurologic dysfunction. While many concussions are self-limiting, some become chronic, causing personal, academic and/or vocational disruption. While talking therapies can help, biofeedback and neurofeedback assessments target the critical area of dysregulation and provide measureable intervention for maximum recovery. Many techniques also can be used for enhancing optimal performance in non-injured persons. Young women can have specific problems with a psychophysiologic basis, such as post concussive migraines and Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS). Women in general have more symptoms and a longer recovery time from sports concussions than males, yet not much is noted in the treatment literature regarding gender differences. In higher achieving women, migraines can be especially debilitating in academic, vocational and/or social situations. Used alone or paired with traditional migraine medication, biofeedback training can both alleviate pain and increase a patients' sense of self-regulation and self-efficacy to minimize the adverse effects of the illness. While POTS is an extreme example of autonomic dysregulation, it is also amenable to psychophysiologic treatment. Case examples provided will include male athletes and pilots with refractory post-concussive syndrome and young female athletes with post-concussion migraines and a young woman with POTS whose successful biofeedback treatment significantly improved her physiologic and psychosocial functioning. A BioPsychoSocial perspective is used for assessment and guiding treatment. Both office and home practice techniques will be presented, paired with behavioral interventions for diet, exercise and sleep.

Speaker:

  • Robert Conder, PsyD, ABPP, Carolina Neuropsych Scvs
  • Alanna A. Conder, PsyD, Licensed psychologist, Carolina Neuropsych Service

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the neuroscience of sports related concussions
  • Describe the indications and contraindications for psychophysiologic BFB and Heart Rate Variability (HRV) intervention for treatment of post-concussive migraines in younger female athletes and the general athlete population
  • Discuss the typical patterns of symptoms, and recovery from a concussion, as opposed to other TBIs
  • Describe the autonomic dysregulation in Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS) and the efficacy of biofeedback (BFB) treatment for this syndrome
  • Discuss the indications and contraindications for neurophysiologic NFB post-concussion

Who Should Attend:
Persons interested in assessing and treating individuals with sport and non-sport concussions, from any etiology (eg, sports concussions, accidents, falls) from a holistic, biopsychosocial perspective emphasizing self-regulation therapies. Also, persons interesting in treating post-concussive migraines in children, adolescents and college-age female athletes. Persons interested in biofeedback treatment of Postural Orthopedic Tacycardia Syndrome (POTS) and migraines unrelated to concussive injury.

Level: Intermediate

Guidelines for Applied Practice: Practice-based Learning and Improvement - How to better communicate HRV data with members on a multidisciplinary human performance team. This talk will explain, from both theoretical and practical perspectives, how neurofeedback and biofeedback practitioners can intervene effectively to treat symptoms associated with post-concussion syndrome. The three areas covered include (1) findings concerning how a concussion affects the brain and the heart, (2) the components of a multimodal assessment, and (3) effective interventions. The process whereby assessment findings lead to effective treatments will be illustrated with case examples that include concussions suffered in sport and in motor vehicle accidents. Attendees will learn something about the neuroanatomical rational that explains why combining heart rate variability training with neurofeedback, including LORETA Z-Score neurofeedback, can help people regain their previous level of functioning. Improvement in symptoms that include depression, anxiety, irritability, sustaining attention, poor memory, sleep disturbances, and social functioning are documented using appropriate pre-post measures. This talk will be of interest to professionals who treat patients with difficulties in any of these areas, even if they have not had a concussion. The methods of treatment recruit neuroplasticity through learning by means of operant conditioning and result in the brain itself changing: synaptic long term potentiation, new dendritic growth, neurogenesis and changes in connectivity. The interventions described improve functioning, in particular, self-regulation of mood, memory and attention. The improved connectivity with LORETA NFB can have a positive effect on executive, affect, and default networks. The primary components of the intervention are neurofeedback (with some LORETA neurofeedback) combined with biofeedback (including Heart Rate Variability training) and those techniques will be explained with a focus on how they are able to induce neuroplastic changes that restore appropriate brain function. Speaker:

  • Lynda Thompson, PhD, Chief Executive Officer and Clinical Director, ADD Centres Ltd & Biofeedback Institute of Toronto
  • Michael Thompson, MD, B.Sc., M.D. D.Psych., CRPC ©

Learning Objectives:

  • List components of assessments for post-concussion syndrome involving psychophysiological measures that can detect the effects of diffuse axonal injury (DAI)
  • List 3 measures (or more) used to assess changes that can occur with LORETA NFB training
  • Outline the basic connections between brain and heart to understand that both systems should be targeted to ameliorate symptoms arising from TBI
  • List 3 measures commonly used to assess results of heart rate variability training.

Who Should Attend:
Health Professionals including but not limited to: Medical Doctors, Psychologists, and other professionals and students in the health professions.

Level: Intermediate

Guidelines for Applied Practice: Medical Knowledge - Functional neuroanatomy and neurophysiology are important in assessing which brain Brodmann areas are not functioning within data-base norms for amplitude and connectivity. Neurophysiology showing the connections of the heart to the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract and its connections throughout the brain stem, brain, and hypothalamus and the hypothalamus to the pituitary and adrenal are essential elements in understanding responses to biofeedback treatment using Heart Rate Variability training.

Michael ThompsonMichael Thompson Michael Thompson, M.D. devotes his time to the administration of the Biofeedback Institute and to writing and teaching. When formerly practicing medicine, he was Associate Professor and head of post-graduate education in Psychiatry, University of Western Ontario, examiner for the Royal College of Physicians (Canada) and chairman of their examinations committee in Psychiatry. Numerous professional publications include A Resident's Guide to Psychiatric Education. While Associate Professor, University of Toronto, he was psychiatric consultant to The Hospital for Sick Children's neurology department. His publications and presentations concerning neurofeedback and biofeedback parallel those of Lynda Thompson, including writing the comprehensive textbook The Neurofeedback Book: An Introduction to Basic Concepts in Applied Psychophysiology, published by the Association for Applied Psychophysiology. Contributions to the fields of psychiatry and applied neuroscience include 48 journal articles, 14 book chapters, and more than 150 presentations in 23 countries concerning neurofeedback and biofeedback.

Lynda ThompsonLynda Thompson Lynda M. Thompson is a Psychologist who has done teaching, clinical psychology, school psychology, and owned learning centres. She became executive director of the ADD Centre in Toronto in 1993 after discovering the world of neurofeedback and deciding to specialize in that intervention. Her doctoral dissertation (1979) deat with hyperactive children treated with methylphenidaate. She is co-author with William Sears of the A.D.D. Book: New understandings, New Approaches to Parenting Your Child and with Michael Thompson of The Neurofeedback Book and has written chapters and papers and presented on a range of topics including ADHD, Asperger's Syndrome, Stress Management, Parkinson's Disease, and epilepsy. She is the co-recipient, with her husband, of the Lifetime Achievement Award (2010) of the Biofeedback Federation of Europe and the Distinguished Scientist Award (2016) if the Association of Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (AAPB).

Robert ConderRobert Conder Dr. Conder was originally trained in Biofeedback and psychophysiology in 1983 at Baylor University and the Veterans Administration Medical Center and in neurofeedback at the Menninger Clinic. He is currently Director & President of Carolina Neuropsychological Service and Neuropsychologist at Duke Raleigh Hospital. He is Board Certified in both Clinical Neuropsychology and Rehabilitation Psychology, and has over 30 years' experience in assessing and treating TBI & neurologic disorders. He was the Neuropsychologist for Carolina Hurricanes and part of the National Hockey League Concussion Management Program and currently works with athletes of all ages and levels, including the North Carolina State University football team. He has published empirical, peer-reviewed studies and is a NIH Grant recipient. Dr. Conder has presented on management of Post Concussion Syndrome at conventions of the American Psychological Association, the National Academy of Neuropsychology and the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback.


BOS32: Mobile Neurofeedback for Pain Management in Veterans with TBI and PTSD

Saturday, April 14, 2018
4:05 PM to 5:05 PM

Title: Mobile Neurofeedback for Pain Management in Veterans with TBI and PTSD

Chronic pain is common in military veterans with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In an R34 National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) funded study, we investigated the feasibility and effectiveness of an innovative, mobile-based neurofeedback protocol used for pain management in veterans with TBI and PTSD. Specifically, we developed a clinical protocol to deliver neurofeedback using mobile devices with a portable NeuroSky headset which reads EEG brain waves, connected via Bluetooth to a mobile device with an application we programmed called "Mobile Neurofeedback." Veterans were instructed to use this app/headset at least 10 minutes a day, 4 times a week for 12 weeks. Data on pain and neurofeedback utilization were collected before, during, and after the 3-month intervention. N=41 veterans with TBI, PTSD, and chronic pain enrolled in this study. Preliminary analysis shows veterans were readily able to use neurofeedback at home after modest training and support from clinicians, and that when they did, veterans reported reduced pain intensity, stress, and anger following mobile neurofeedback. To our knowledge, this project is the first to test feasibility and effectiveness of mobile neurofeedback in veterans with chronic pain, PTSD, and TBI. This study shows promise of a portable, technology-based neuromodulatory approach to pain management.

Speakers:

  • Eric Elbogen, PhD, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will learn about prevalence and outcomes associated with what has been termed the polytrauma clinical triad (chronic pain, TBI, and PTSD) in military veterans
  • Participants will learn about the feasibility of implementing neurofeedback using mobile devices at home in veterans with chronic pain, PTSD, and TBI
  • Participants will learn about preliminary effects of implementing neurofeedback using mobile devices at home in veterans with chronic pain, PTSD, and TBI

Who Should Attend:
clinicians, particular those who serve military veterans

Level: Introductory

Guidelines in Applied Practice: Patient Care - How to facilitate individuals with chronic pain implementing EEG biofeedback on their own at home


BOS33: Application of a Piloted Biofeedback Pediatric Headache Protocol and...

Saturday, April 14, 2018
4:05 PM to 5:05 PM

Title: Application of a Piloted Biofeedback Pediatric Headache Protocol and Adaptability with Challenging Cases

Pediatric headache is one of the most common pain complaints at an estimated prevalence range from 57-82% in children and adolescents 8-15 years of age (Singhi, Jacobs & Gladstein, 2014). Headaches and migraines can be devastating, leading to a decreased quality of life in emotional, social, and educational domains (Powers, Gilman, & Hershey, 2006). Meta-analysis reported elevated levels of internalizing and externalizing levels of psychiatric symptomatology (Balottin et al., 2012; Holden et al. 1999). The medically symptoms that can sometimes co-occur with the various psychiatric symptoms can create a unique picture that requires a multi-model approach to treatment. Based on the type of headache and migraines, specific types of pharmacological and bio-behavioral approaches have significantly improved pediatric migraines/headaches. Biofeedback, together with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and other psychosocial/behavioral based interventions offer an efficacious way of reducing headache frequency, intensity and duration while improving quality of life. EMG biofeedback has been shown to be efficacious in the treatment of tension type headache, while thermal biofeedback has been shown to be efficacious in the treatment of migraine( Ernst, O'Brien & Powers, 2015; Stubberud, Varkey, McCrory, Pedersen, & Linde, 2016). This symposium will discuss a comprehensive approach to treating 3 types of pediatric headache (tension, migraine, and mixed), which includes biofeedback, CBT, and psychosocial/behavioral based interventions with various complex psychological symptoms. Additionally, this symposium will address how to improve the communication or "buy in" from these families that are only seeking a medical approach to their child's pain and how to talk to children and families about the complexities of headaches and pain and how to apply brief CBT/biofeedback approaches to challenging patients.

Speaker(s):

  • Katie Fleischman, PhD, Pediatric Psychologist

Learning Objectives:

  • Summarize the basic types of headache/migraines and co- ccurring mental health symptoms
  • Recognize differences and in acute and chronic pain and how to talk about this complex theory and treatment to families
  • Summarize the multi-model/interdisciplinary approach and treatment for pediatric headache
  • Provide case examples and application of a brief Biofeedback/CBT intervention on challenging cases with various co-occuring mental health symptoms

Who Should Attend:
Biofeedback clinicians working with children and adolescents, and those interested in learning more about comprehensive treatment of pediatric headache

Level:
Introductory

Guidance in Applied Practice: TBD

Katie FleischmanKatie Fleischman Katie Fleischman, Ph.D is a pediatric psychologist at the Boston's Children's Hospital's Department of Neurology Headache Program and an Instructor at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Fleischman specializes in research, assessment, and treatment of children and adolescents with acute and chronic medical conditions, with a particular focus on pain. Currently, she is conducting research, teaching and providing consultation, psychotherapy, and biofeedback to youth with migraines, headaches, and post concussive syndrome. Dr. Fleischman has presented on the topic of pediatric pain, migraine, and headache at numerous institutions and conferences.


BOS34: MultiCultural Diversity Topics for Biofeedback Practitioners

Saturday, April 14, 2018
4:05 PM to 5:05 PM

Title: MultiCultural Diversity Topics for Biofeedback Practitioners

TThe session suggests approaches for fostering multi-cultural diversity practices and policies within organizations and among individual practitioners focusing on understanding the role of culture as well as race/ethnicity in various socioeconomically and ethnically diverse groups. The presentation addresses types of vulnerability experienced by individuals identifying as a particular minority groups (e.g. racial, religious, sexual. minority). Additional topics of discussion include considerations about age, race, creed, complexion, class, culture, national origin, language, disabilities, sex, gender and sexual orientation on behaviors related to teaching and training of psychophysiological self-regulation skills. Both general models as well as specific case examples are presented.

Speaker:

  • Richard Harvey, PhD, San Francisco State University, HED

Learning Objectives:

  • Specify models of multi-cultural diversity and competence
  • Identify seven stages related to developing degrees of cultural competence
  • Develop a plan for implementing culturally competent skills and policies in your practice
  • Propose some best practices for multicultural training in organizations and individuals based on the 'CRASH' or 'LEARN' programs

Who Should Attend:
All levels

Level: Introductory

Guidelines in Applied Practice: Practice-based Learning and Improvement 1) Educates learners about specific models of multi-cultural diversity and competence. 2) Helps learners identify seven stages related to developing degrees of cultural competence. 3) Suggests methods for developing a plan for implementing culturally competent skills and policies in your practice. 4) Proposes some best practices for multicultural training in organizations and individuals based on the 'CRASH' or 'LEARN' programs.

Richard HarveyRichard Harvey Richard Harvey, PhD teaches at San Francisco State University, and has served as President of the Western Association of Biofeedback and Neuroscience (when the association was called the Biofeedback Society of California), and the Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback. Richard has also served in leadership positions in the San Francisco Psychological Association, and the American Public Health Association, Alternative and Complementary Health Practices, promoting biofeedback techniques in the public health interest. Professional experience includes working as an Epidemiologist in Orange County, California; as a Tobacco-Use Research Center Fellow; and, directing the UC Irvine Counseling Center Biofeedback Program, before joining the faculty at San Francisco State University. Research includes developing holistic stress-reduction interventions using biofeedback, as well as other federally funded research related to tobacco use and cessation.


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